Killingly, Connecticut Biographies

William Preston Aldrich was born in 1836 in Thompson. He is a son of Jonathan, and grandson of Jonathan, whose father, Levi, was a son of Levi Aldrich. His mother was Abigail, daughter of Samuel Darling. He is a stone mason by trade, although he and his brother have a farm where they live. He was married in 1871 to Rhoda, daughter of John Tanner. They have three children: James, Proctor, and Jessie. Mr. Aldrich is a prohibitionist.

Jonathan Aldrich was born in 1840 in Killingly, and is a son of Jonathan and Abigail Aldrich. He is a stone mason by trade. He was married in September, 1873, to Lydia Burlingame. They have three children: Florence, Phineas, and Edna.

Clayton L. Alexander, born in December, 1862, is a son of the late Colonel Luther Alexander, who died in March, 1879. His mother is Mrs. Samuel D. Danielson. He was educated at the public schools of Killingly, at the Woodstock Academy, and at the Friends' School of Providence, R. I. He has been in the brick business at Palmer, Mass., since 1884, where he has displayed a business ability rarely seen in men of his age. He was married in July, 1880, to Anna A., daughter of Wolcott Day. They have four children: Luther D., C. Clifford, Orrilus W. and Dorothy. Mr. Alexander is a democrat.

Miss Emma F. Alexander is a daughter of Colonel William, who received his title in the state militia. Nell Alexander was the first of the family to settle in Killingly in 1721, and purchased a large tract of land near the northwest corner of the town. He was married the same year, 1721, to Susan Adams, whose ancestors came to America in 1630. Their only son Nell, married Prudence Cady, and their only son Nell, born in 1757, married Esther Smith, by whom he had nine children, among whom was William, better known as " Colonel William," born March 24th, 178 7. He was married in 1816 to Susan, daughter of Captain John Day. They had eight children, three of whom are now living-Emma F., Join D. and Reverend W. S. Alexander, D. D., of North Cambridge, Mass. Colonel William was state senator one term and representative several terms. Prior to 1856 he was a democrat, after that time a republican. He built the residence in 1847 where Emma F. now lives. He died in October, 1875, his wife having died eight years previous.

Anthony Ames was born in 1826 in Sterling, Conn. He is a son of Eliphalet Ames, and grandson of Samuel, whose father Mark, was a son of Anthony Ames. He came to this town at the age of seven years, was educated at Danielsonville Academy, and at the age of eighteen began to teach. In 1846 he went into the store at Ballouville, where he kept the books and store for the company two years. In 1853 he went into the mercantile business in Danielsonville, keeping a dry goods store for about ten years, then a clothing store until 1877, when he sold out to E. A. Finley. He was president of the Windham County Savings Bank from 1876 to 1886, and since that time has been vice-president. He has been a member of the school board about thirty years, and was town clerk and treasurer about twenty years. He was elected representative in 1888 as a republican.. He was married in 1853 to Abbie M. Wheaton. He is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M., and has been secretary for fourteen years.

Henry Clinton Atwood, born in Williamsville in 1856, is the oldest son of William Allen and Caroline (Hargrave) Atwood. Mr. Atwood went from the schools of this town to the Friends' school at Providence, thence to the University Grammar School of Providence, finishing his education in 1878 at Brown University. He took charge of the company store at Williamsville. and continued in the same until his father's death in June, 1881 since that time he has been superintendent for the Manufacturing Company. He has been on the school Board four years, and in 1888 was elected to represent this town in the legislature. He was married in 1878 to L. B. Whitford, daughter of Thomas W. Whitford. They have one son, Clinton William.

Kimball Atwood, born in 1830 in Scituate, R. I., is a son of William C. and grandson of Kimball Atwood. His mother was Julianna, daughter of Major Richard M. Andrews. Mr. Atwood came from Rhode Island to Williamsville in 1850, where he remained until 1862, with the exception of one year. From 1862 to 1865 he served in Company K, 18th Connecticut volunteers, as first sergeant. Since 1865 he has been overseer of carding. He was married in 1856 to Abbie J., daughter of William Newell. They have one son, Earl K. Mr. Atwood is a republican.

Orrin S. Arnold, son of Henry B. Arnold. was born in 1837 in Coventry, R. I. He learned the trade of bobbin and spool maker in Coventry, R. I. He came to Williamsville in 1864 and bought an interest in the bobbin manufactory of R. N. Potter, and continued in company with Mr. Potter until the latter's death in 1879. Soon after Mr. Arnold bought of the Potter heirs their interest in the business and continued alone until 1887, when he took as partner G. D. Barber. The firm is now the Arnold Barber Bobbin Company. Mr. Arnold was married in 1873 to Lucy M. C., daughter of Simon and Mary (Danielson) Buck, daughter of Captain Samuel and Elizabeth (Spaulding) Danielson. They have two children. Mr. Arnold built the residence where he now lives in 1867.

A. E. Austin, born in 1831 in Killingly, is a son of Silas and Susan (Easton) Austin. He is painter for the Williamsville Manufacturing Company. He was married in 1852 to Rosanna, daughter of Robert K. Hargrave, whose father was William Hargrave. They have two sons-Oscar T., born in 1857, and Charles E. Oscar T. has been employed sixteen years by the Williamsville Manufacturing Company. He is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M. Mrs. Austin is a member of the Congregational church of Williamsville.

Charles H. Bacon was born in 1851, in Killingly, Conn. He is a son of William C., whose father, David A., was a son of David Bacon. William C. Bacon began the furniture and undertaking business at Westfield about 1820, and when the Arcade block was built on Main street he moved his business to the south rooms of the block, where he continued until the burning of the building, and later continued in the block that was built in its place until its burning the second time. Then he took the business to the Rothal Hall building where it still is. At Mr. Bacon's death in 1877, Charles H. took full control of the business, having being with his father several years. He keeps a full line of house furnishing goods. He sold the undertaking business to J. J. Reynolds in 1S85. Mr. Bacon was married in 1871 to Alice M., daughter of John Lily. They have two sons: Edward H. and William C. Mr. Bacon isa member of the Congregational church.

Isaac B. Ballard was born January 16th, 1817. His father Isaac was in the war of 1812, and his grandfather, Jacob, was in the war of the revolution. He is the only survivor of five children. He is a farmer, and built the house where he has since resided in 1861 near Ballouville. He was married January 30th, 1848, to Mrs. Susan P. Smith, daughter of Spencer Dingley, son of Levi, who was a son of Jacob Dingley, of Maine. Mr. Ballard is a republican.

David Barrovclow, son of David Barrovclow, -was born in Yorkshire, England, in 1813. He was a mill operative in England for several years. He came to Woonsocket, R. I., in 1848, where he worked at manufacturing until 1871, when he came to .Killingly, where for several years he was engaged with S. & H. Sayles. In 1883 he built a residence near Dayville, where he now lives. He was married in 184S to Elizabeth Fenly. She died in 1864, leaving two sons, Frederick W. and Charles H. He was married in 1864 to Alice Barrot. They have one son, Albert.

Mary A. Bartlett was a daughter of Arba Covell, son of Sampson, and he a son of Ebenezer Covell. She was married in September, 1832, to Waldo Bartlett, son of Reuben and grandson of Richard Bartlett. He was born in Killingly in 1810, was a farmer, and died at his home in East Killingly in 1873. They had nine children: Leonard, Almond, Mary E., Prescott, Hattie K., Almira, Reuben, Henry and Charles, all of whom are living.

Leonard Bartlett, eldest son of Waldo, was born July 13th, 1833. He was educated at the deaf mute school of Hartford, from 1847 to 1852. He learned the shoemaker's trade while there, and has followed the business since that time at East Killingly. He has been thrice married: first, to Theresa L. Barber, second, to Patient E. Slocum, and third, to Abbie N. Fitch. He has one daughter, Mary E., by the first marriage, and two children by the second marriage-Clarence A. and Clara A.

Frank W. Bennett, son of Sampson Bennett, was born in 1859. He attended the grammar and high schools of Killingly, then the high school of Exeter, New Hampshire, for one year. He was at Eastman's College in the winter of 1879-SO. He entered the office of the Sabin L. Sayles Manufacturing Company at the age of fifteen years, and has continued in the same, with the exception of the two years, 1880 and 1881. He is now bookkeeper and paying clerk for the company. He is a republican, a member of Assawaga Lodge, No. 20, A. 0. U. W., and a member of John Lyon Lodge, No. 45, K. of P.

Wheaton A. Bennett, born in 1826 in Killingly, is a son of Sterry and grandson of Israel Bennett. He was for about twenty years overseer of weaving in a factory in Massachusetts. He came to the farm near Ballouville where he now lives in 1867, and since that time has been a farmer. He was married in 1846 to Hepsibeth, daughter of Jeremiah Law. They have one son, Adelbert L., and one daughter that died, Ella L. Mr. Bennett is a democrat, and a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M.

Caleb Blanchard was born in 1833. He is a son of George, whose father, Caleb, was a son of Isaac Blanchard, who was a descendant of the French Huguenots. He has been a carpenter since 1850; was contractor and builder until 1873, and since that time he has been boss carpenter for the Ballouville mills. He was in the war of the rebellion, in Company B, 18th Connecticut volunteers, from August, 1862, until May, 1865, and was discharged as sergeant. He was married in 1856 to Martha Preston. They have two children-Ada E. and Mary F. He is a member of Marvin Waite Post, No. 51, G. A. R., and a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M.'

Charles S. Blackmar was born in 1853. His father, Charles P., was a son of John and grandson of Richard Blackmar, who came to this country with three brothers. His mother is Harriet, daughter of Franklin Clark, son of Moody and grandson of Edward Clark. Mr. Blackmar was educated at the Danielsonville schools. He was bookkeeper for the Danielsonville Manufacturing Company from 1874 to 1887, and in August, 1887, became bookkeeper for the Attawaugan Manufacturing Company, which position he has since filled. He married in 1877 Sue, daughter of Dean and Mary (Kennedy) West, the latter a daughter of Joshua Kennedy. They have one daughter, Mae. Mr. Blackmar is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M. His father, C. P. Blackmar, is in the post office department at Washington.

Shubael Blanchard, born in 1831 in Plainfield, is a son of Abraham and grandson of Caleb Blanchard. His mother was Minerva (Potter) Blanchard. He came from Plainfield to Killingly in 1848, where he has worked for twenty-four years at carpenter work, but he is now farming. He was married in 1855 to Martha J., daughter of George W. and Delila (Russel) Randall. They have four-children: Henry M., Emily E., Carrie and Grace E. Mr. Blanchard is a democrat.

Alfred B. Boswell, born in 1833, in Foster, R. I., is a son of William and grandson of William Boswell, who came to this country from England about the time of the " Boston Tea Party,'-' and served under Washington in the revolution. His mother was Diana, daughter of Doctor Jerry Wilcox, of Foster. Mr. Boswell is a stone mason and has worked at that trade about thirty-seven years. He came to Danielsonville in 1884. For twenty-three years prior to that time he lived in South Killingly, on the farm that he still owns. He was married in 1858 to Harriet, daughter of George Babcock. They have three children Alfred A., Susan H. and George C. Mr. Boswell is a poultry fancier and breeds some very fine specimens. He is vice-president of the Danielsonville Poultry Association. He is a republican.

Nicholas Bowen, son of David and Mary (Bussey) Bowen, was born in 1826 in Glocester. He is a carpenter by trade. He came to Dayville from Rhode Island in July, 1865, and the winter following he went into the shop of the S. L. Sayles Manufacturing Company, where he had charge of repairs on iron until May, 1885, and since that time he has worked at carpentering. He was married in 1848 to Sarah, daughter of Joshua Card, of Sterling, Conn. They have two children living-Mary E. (Mrs. Frank Burnett), and Julia E. They lost six: Edward Everett, Lucy M., Charles A., Thankful B., Charlie M. and David A. Mr. Bowen is a republican.

Oliver W. Bowen, born in 1843 in Foster, R. I., is a son of Nelson C., and grandson of Oliver Bowen. He was in the hardware and undertaking business with his father, firm of N. C. Bowen & Son, from 1869 to 1876. He started a livery stable in Danielsonville in 1882, which he still runs. He is selectman of the town as a republican. He was married in 1866 to Ada E., daughter of Josiah H. Randall. He is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M.

Thomas Bradford, born in 1849 in Canterbury, is a son of Archibald, and grandson of Thomas Bradford. His mother is Emeline, daughter of Abby Hyde. Mr. Bradford came to Danielsonville in April, 1871, and fitted up a shop, where he worked at wagon making about six years, and since that time has worked at different kinds of mechanical work. . In 1887 he built a stone arched bridge in Danielsonville, which cost $5,300. He is now serving his second year as selectman as a democrat. He was married in 1882 to Ida E., daughter of Marcus L. Aldrich. They have one son, Lewis A.

Albert Brown, born December 4th, 1822, is the only child of Artemas, and grandson of Joseph Brown, who came from Pomfret to Breakneck hill, where he remained until his death. His mother was Achsa Harrington. Mr. Brown was a shoemaker by trade, having followed the business for about thirty years, but since then he has been a farmer at the north end of Breakneck _ hill, where he now resides. He was married in December, 1846, to Celia, daughter of John H. Marcey. They have two daughters-Emma A. (Mrs. J. M. Keene) and Anna A. (Mrs. Frank H. Bowen).

Dexter Remington Burdick, born in 1823 in Voluntown, Conn., is a son of Cranston and Prudence (Lillibridge) Burdick. He is a cotton manufacturer, having been overseer and superintendent of different mills in Rhode Island, Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts and New Hampshire. He has lived at East Killingly since 1884. He was married in 1876 to Mrs. Emily C. Reynolds, daughter of George A. and Lucy (Mastcraft) Columbus. By a former marriage Mr. Burdick had four children: John F., George H., Helen E. (deceased), and Hattie A. Mr. Burdick is a member of the Masonic and Odd Fellows orders.

Daniel P. Burlingham was born January 21st, 1818, in New York. He is a son of Samuel, whose father, Benjamin, was a son of Jonathan Burlingham. His mother, Randilla, was a daughter of Daniel Preston. Mr. Burlingham came to Killingly about forty years ago, was for several years in the grocery business, and since that time has been farming in a small way. He was married November 22d, 1838, to Hannah G., daughter of Lewis Bateman, he a son of Thomas, he a son of Hector, and he a son of Lord William Henry Bateman. Seth and Luther Bateman are second cousins to Mrs. B. They have one son, Daniel L. Mr. Burlingham has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Danielsonville since 1846, class leader about thirty years, and trustee twenty-five years.

Harris O. Burton, son of Elliot and Bernice (Williams) Burton, was born in Foster, R. I., in 1836, and came to Killingly from Rhode Island in 1850. He has been a cotton mill operative for many years, and overseer of weaving for the past fifteen years at the "Valley Mills." He was married in 1857 to Olive F., daughter of Reverend Jonathan Oatley. They have one son, Walter F., and one daughter, Elizabeth A., who died in infancy. Mr. Burton is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 1.5. F. & A. M.

Fred. L. Butts was born in 1856 in Killingly. His father, Henry W. Butts, was born in 1829, and married in 1856 Sarah J., daughter of William C. Marple. They have five children: Fred. L., Orrilla R., Phoebe L., Anna E. and Sarah H. Mr. Butts is a brick mason by trade. He was in California from 1884 until January, 1888.

George W. Butts, born in 1830 in Plainfield, Conn., is a son of Hollis, and grandson of Luther Butts. His mother was Rebecca, daughter of Benedict Hopkins. Mr. Butts was at Coventry, Conn., nine years, coming from there to Williamsville in 1864, where he built a house with a view to keeping a hotel with store in basement. He has kept a store several years, and a livery stable since he came here. He was married in 1853 to Sabra C., daughter of Arbey and Rachel (Vaughn) Adams. They have five children: Edna E., Hattie E., M. Rosa, George W. Jr., and Bertha M. Mr. Butts is a republican.

E. S. Carpenter, son of Richard Carpenter, was born in 1838, in Thompson. His mother was Cyntha, daughter of William Walker. Mr. Carpenter was brought up a farmer. He came to Danielsonville in 1861, and for about ten years was in the shoe factory of Abner Young. He has collected the borough tax sixteen years, town tax six years and school tax eight years, has been constable nineteen years, for sixteen years has been -a member of the republican committee, and fifteen years chairman of that body. He was married in 1862 to Julia, daughter of Mowry and Hannah Knight. They have one daughter, Ella L., two sons having died-Edward C. in infancy and Vernon L. aged twelve years. He is a member of the Danielsonville Baptist church, and has been sexton of the new church since it was built. He is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M., also a member of Warren Chapter and Montgomery Council.

John G. Carter, son of Nehemiah, was born April 28th, 1842, in Westboro, Mass. He went to Boston at the age of seventeen, and since that time has been an artist. He was for five years in the studio of William M. Hunt. He has spent one year in Europe, and has traveled extensively in America. Since his marriage he has spent his summers in Danielsonville, and for the past two years has claimed his residence there. He was married in 1868 to Ada, daughter, of Harvey, Jr., and Lucy (Pierce) Chamberlin, and granddaughter of Harvey Chamberlin. Mr. and Mrs. Carter now occupy the house which was built by her father about fifty years ago. The latter was a stone mason by trade, and did much of the stone work_ on the Norwich and Worcester Branch Railroad.

Matthew W. Chace, born in 1850 in Killingly, Conn., is a son of Sanford and grandson of Robert Chace. His mother is Eliza W., daughter of Solomon Peck. Mr. Chace bought a farm in Pomfret in 1876, where he resided until April, 1886, and since that time he has been boss farmer for the Williamsville Manufacturing Company. He was married June 8th, 1876, to Kate, daughter of John F. Spencer. They have one daughter, Mary Eliza. He is a member of Wolfden Grange, of Pomfret, P. of H.

Benjamin F. Chapman, born in 1813 in Cumberland, R. I., is a son of John and grandson of Benjamin Chapman. His mother was Abbie, daughter of Peter Miller. Mr. Chapman was brought up a farmer, in 1840 began dealing in farm produce, in 1842 began to slaughter and peddle meat in Pomfret. and a short time later moved the business to Dayville, and in 1844 to Danielsonville, where he continued (with the exception of three years when he rented the business and went to New York state) until September, 1880, when the son, Charles F., succeeded to the business. He was married in 1842 to Ruth L., daughter of Jeremiah Field. They have seven children living: Laura A., William J., Charles F., Mary E., Robert B., Frank W. and Helen L. They lost two: George and Augusta. Mr. Chapman has been selectman two years as a democrat.

Charles F. Chapman, son of Benjamin F., was born in 1847 in Killingly, Conn. In 1870 Mr. Chapman went to Worcester, Mass., where he worked at the butcher business until August, 1880. The month following he bought his father's business in Danielsonville, which he has run since that time. He runs two carts and handles about $3,000 worth of meat per month. He was married February 9th, 1871, to S. M. A. Chase, daughter of William A. Chase. They have two children: Harry F. and Walter C. Mr. Chapman is a democrat and a member of the order of Odd Fellows.

Giles Chase, born in Killingly August 23d, 1810, is a son of Judge David Chase, born 1779 and died 1866. He was county judge two terms and judge of probate two years. He was the oldest son of Edward Chase, who was a son of David Chase. Giles Chase's mother was Amy, daughter of Whitney Graves. He is a civil engineer and surveyor. He has been on the board - of selectmen two terms. He resided in Mechanicsville from 1868 until 1888. In August of that year he returned to Killingly, where he now resides. He was married in 1842 to Orpha D., daughter of Joshua Spaulding. They have six children: Omera G., Canova, David, Charles D., Cassius S. and Emma F.

Cassius S. Chase, son of Giles and Orpha (Spaulding) Chase, was born in 1854 in Killingly, Conn. He went from Killingly to Mechanicsville in 1868. While there he was ina store several years, leaving it to come to Elmville in January, 1886, where he has been in business with Charles D. Chase, firm of C. D. & C. S. Chase. He was married in 1885 to Cora M., daughter of Erastus Alton. They have one son, Harold Alton. He is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M., and of John Lyon Lodge, No. 4,5, K. of P. He is a republican.

Charles D. Chase, son of Giles and Orpha (Spaulding) Chase, mentioned above, was born in 1852 in Killingly, Conn. He went from Killingly to Mechanicsville in 1868, and there learned the business of woolen manufacturing. In 1876 he went to Jeffersonville, Mass., where he superintended a woolen mill for nine years. January 1st, 1886, he came to Elmville, where, in company with his brother Cassius S., he has run a woolen mill since that time, the production being fancy cassimeres. They now run 24 broad looms and employ 75 hands. Their power is a fall in the Whetstone brook, supplemented by steam. He was married June 28th, 1877, to Eliza J., daughter of Nathan Doty. They have four children: Warren D., Marvin E., Herbert G. and Alice B. They lost two, Charles E. and Harry S. Mr. Chase is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M., and a member of John Lyon Lodge, No. 45, K. of P.

Chauncy C. Chase was born in 1850 in Killingly. He is a son of George W., son of Abner, son of Cromwell, son of Oliver, son of Oliver Chase. His mother was Mary Watson. Mr. Chase went into the employ of the Attawaugan Manufacturing Company in 1867. In 1872 he was made overseer of carding at Ballouville, and one year later took charge of carding at Attawaugan, which he continued for ten years, the last four of which he had charge of carding at both mills. In 1884 he was made superintendent at Ballouville, which place he still fills. He was married in 1868 to Elizabeth A. Harrington. They have four children: Clarence C., Albert A., Eva flay and George H. He is a member of the Attawaugan Methodist Episcopal church, a member of Assawaga Lodge, No. 20, A. O. U. W., and a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 1.5, F. & A. 11.

Cromwell D. Chase, born in 1827, is the oldest son of Cromwell, and grandson of Reuben Chase. His mother was Mahala .(Wood) Chase. Mr. Chase is a farmer,-having owned and occupied the farm where he now lives since 1856. He was selectman one term. He was married to Mary W. Bastow. She died in 1881, leaving three children: Mary D., Susan M. and Cromwell O. Mr. Chase is a democrat.

Samuel C. Chase, born August 23d, 1817, is the oldest son of Danford, and grandson of Reuben Chase. His mother was Lucy Covell. Mr. Chase was educated in the district schools of the town. He was a farmer in early life, but since 1856 he has been a doctor, his principal treatment being magnetism. He has a large practice, having offices in Providence, Norwich and Putnam. He has been selectman several years, judge of probate one term, and one term representative in the legislature. He has been married three times: first to Emily Fuller, who died leaving three children-Lucy A., Samuel O. (deceased) and Emily J. The second wife was Mary M. Burlingham, who died childless. The third wife was Tamison Rich. They have one son, Rufus R.

William A. Chase was born in 1831 in Killingly. He is a son of Abner, whose father Cromwell, was a son of Oliver, and grandson of Oliver Chase. His mother was Esther, daughter of Jacob Cleveland. He was in the war of the rebellion, in Company A, 12th Rhode Island volunteers, enlisting in September, 1862, for nine months. Since 1863 he has been employed in the butcher business. He was town clerk one year. He was married in 1851 to Amanda M., daughter of Obed Fuller. They have three daughters-Mrs. C. F. Chapman, Mrs. E. H. Storrs and Mrs. Frank T. Preston. Mr. Chase is a democrat and a member of the Danielsonville Baptist church.

George J. Clark, born in 1828, in Chaplin, Conn., is a son of James, born in 1786, and grandson of Daniel Clark, born in 1750. His mother was Sally, daughter of John and Jerusha Richardson. His grandmother was Mehitabel (Slate) Clark. Mr. Clark is a mason by trade. He has lived in Killingly about twenty-five years. He built a handsome residence on Broad street in 1883. He was married in 1854 to Adelia H., daughter, of Ira Gregory, a son of Ira Gregory. They have one daughter, Nettie E. They lost two children-Delia A. and Henry G. Mr. Clark is a democrat and a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M.

Benjamin Cogswell was born February 17th, 1838, in Trowbridge, England, and is a son of William; and Elizabeth Cogswell. Mr. Cogswell came from England to Burrillville, R. I., in 1848, where he resided until July, 1866. He was interested in manufacturing, was for several years overseer of weaving, and for the last year there was superintendent of a manufacturing concern. In July, 1866, he came to Dayville, and was superintendent of S. L. Sayles' mill until March, 1887, and since that time he has been confined to the house by sickness. He was married December 25th, 1858, to Sarah S., daughter of Daniel S. and Mary Rebecca Shumway. Their children are: Ida L. (Mrs. Frank G. Bailey), Cora Edna, Mabel S., Bernice S., Will D. and Benjamin S. He is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M., of John Lyon Lodge, No. 45, K. of P., and of the Ancient Order of United Workmen.

Samuel Cogswell, son of William and Elizabeth Cogswell, was born in 1846 in England, and came to Rhode Island in 1847. He came from Burrillville, R. I., to Dayville in 1866, and learned the business of woolen manufacturing with S. & H. Sayles. About ten years later he went to Adams, Mass., where he superintended a mill for Peter Blackinton about five years. He came to Killingly with T. E. Hopkins in 1880, and since that time has superintended his woolen mill. He was married in February, 1868, to Emily A., daughter of Albert S. Potter. They have two children-Edna E. and Frank E. He is a member of John Lyon Lodge, No. 45, K. of P., also a member of Assawaga Lodge, No. 20, A. O. U. W.

William Comins, born in 1820 in Woodstock, Conn., is a son of Parker Comins, who came from Woodstock to Putnam in 1825, and three years later to Danielsonville. His mother was Lucy, daughter of David Copp. Mr. Comins acquired the harness maker's trade when a lad. He was in Company K, 18th Connecticut volunteers, from August 18th, 1862, until the close of the war. His brother Alfred was in the service in the 17th Connecticut volunteers, and was shot at Cold Harbor. He has been loom harness maker for twenty-five years. He was married November 30th, 1843, to Eliza M., daughter of Philip Tanner, who ,was in the war of 1812. He was the son of William, who served seven years in the revolution, and also served in the war of 1812. They have three sons. He is a member of the Congregational church, and a republican.

Charles F. Coone, son of Frank and Susan (Hale) Coone, was born in 1840 in Brooklyn, Conn. He was a farmer until he was twenty-five years old, and at that time began to learn the carpenter's trade, which he has since followed. Since 1880 he has been working at repairs for the Quinebaug Manufacturing Coin. He built the residence on Broad street where he now lives in 1874. He was married in 1869 to Emily M., daughter of John R. Stone. Mr. Coone is a republican.

Oliver Smith Covell was born in 1829 in Killingly. He is a son of Oliver, son of Sampson, son of Ebenezer, son of Joseph Covell, who owned and occupied a farm at the north end of Chestnut hill. Mr. Covell owns and occupies the farm where his father lived from 1816 until his death in 1852. This is the same farm where the wife of Ephraim Fisk gave birth to four children about 1780. This quadruple birth is discussed in many families of the town to this day. The house in which these four babes spent the first few years of their lives is now occupied by Mr. Covell. In this same house was born the father of Clinton B. Fisk, whose mother was a second wife of Ephraim Fisk. Mr. Covell was married in 1852 to Mary A. W., daughter of Orrin Reynolds. They have one daughter, Mary L. (Mrs. D. Cutler. Oliver Covell was in the war of 1812. One of his sons was killed at Cold Harbor during the war of the rebellion. He served in the 11th Connecticut volunteers.

Sidney W. Crofut was born in 1847 in Brooklyn, N. Y. He received a military education at the Military Academy on the Hudson. Mr. Crofut has been connected with large corporations, and for many years in an official capacity, and has the reputation of being an able and experienced business man and financier, and is esteemed as a representative citizen of the borough of Danielsonville and town of Killingly. He came to Danielsonville from Brooklyn, N. Y., in 1884, and at that time bought an interest in the fire insurance and real estate agency of E. L. Palmer. The business was continued in the firm name of Palmer & Crofut until September, 1886, when the partnership was dissolved by mutual consent, Mr. Crofut succeeding to the insurance business of the firm, which he has continued since that time. He represents a lire of leading companies, and by his thorough business methods and known integrity has won a large patronage, and given his agency a wide popularity in his own and adjoining towns. He is a prominent and active member of the Baptist church, and treasurer of the society. He is one of the trustees of the Windham County Savings Bank, and was for some time president of the People's Library Association. He is one of the committee of the high school. In politics Mr. Crofut is a staunch republican. In April, 1887, he was elected a member of the court of burgesses of Danielsonville. In April, 1888, he was chosen warden of the borough, and the intelligence and executive ability exhibited by him in that office have proven him thoroughly competent to fill executive offices of even much greater importance. It was during his term as warden that the borough contracted for fifty hydrants for fire purposes, and he was one of the gentlemen prominent in bringing this about. In the presidential campaign of 1888 he was vice-chairman of the Harrison and Morton Club executive committee, and in this position he brought into play the same adaptability to business methods and thorough mastery of and close attention to details which he puts into anything he undertakes. He owns and occupies one of the finest residences in the borough.

Rufus D. Curtis, born in 1824 in Ashford, is a son of Norman, who was a soldier in the war of 1812, and whose father, Chester Curtis, was in the revolutionary war. His mother was Margaret, daughter of John Greenman, of Kingston, R. I. Mr. Curtis was brought up on a farm in Brooklyn. In 1860 he came to Killingly and built the house where he now resides, having been a farmer since that time. He served in the war of the rebellion from August 1st, 1862, to September 23d, 1865, in the 18th Connecticut volunteers, Company K. He lost his right leg June 5th, 1864. He was married in 1848 to Lydia, daughter of Gardiner Phillips. They have six children: Emma (Mrs. G. I. Hopkins), Janette (Mrs. W. E. Talbot), Ida, Estelle, Lena (Mrs. George H. Tripp) and Lewis L. G., who graduated from Exeter Academy in June, 1889.

Edward P. Danielson was born in 1831 in Killingly, Conn. He is a son of Jacob, son of Samuel, son of Samuel, son of Samuel, son of James Danielson, who was the original settler here, and who established and laid out the Westfield cemetery. His mother was Lucy M. Prince. She had five children: George Whitman, Edward P., Eliza M., L. Jane and William J. Mr. Danielson is a house carpenter by trade. In 1868 he built the house where he now lives, and since that time he has been a farmer and carpenter. He was married in 1861 to Mary E. Johnson. She died in September, 1883. They had two children that died: Walter E. and Ella M. Mr. Danielson's grandfather was in the war of 1812.

Eliza A. Danielson is a daughter of Alvira Durfee, granddaughter of Philip Durfee, a son of Captain William Durfee. She was married in 1861 to James Danielson, who was born in 1832. He was in the war of the rebellion in Company F, 11th Connecticut volunteers, from 1861 until his death, which occurred October 12th, 1864. Ide entered the service as a private and held the rank of sergeant at the time of his death.

Emily Danielson, born in Killingly, Conn., is a daughter of Samuel S., who died in 1864. He was a son of Samuel, son of Samuel, son of Samuel, whose father, James Danielson, was the first of the name to settle here, having come from Block Island, R. I., in 1706. Her mother was Esther (Williams) Danielson, who died in 1888. Samuel S. Danielson was a farmer of more than ordinary enterprise. He, like all the Danielson family, was a liberal supporter of the gospel, being a member of the Congregational church of Westfield. He was married October 22d, 1833, to Esther, daughter of Eleazer Williams. They had seven children, of whom only the subject of this sketch is living. They were: Harriet G., who died aged 23 years; two sons and one daughter that died in infancy; Edwin W., who died aged two years; Herbert S., who died aged 23 years, and Emily.

George E. Danielson, born in 1854 in Killingly, is a son of Elisha, whose father James, was a son of William, who built the house where George E. now lives in 1786. He also served in the war of the revolution. He was a son of Samuel, whose father James Danielson bought of Major Fitch in 1707 all the land that lies between the Quinebaug and Five Mile rivers, and north as far as Alexander's pond. Elisha Danielson married for his third wife, Sarah, daughter of Eli Ely. They had nine children, of whom the following are living: Catharine E., William H., Edwin L., George E. and Walter H. Mr. Danielson was married in 1886 to Harriet K., daughter of Thomas R. Baxter. They have one daughter, Catherine K. Mr. Danielson is a member of Westfield Congregational church.

Helen L. Danielson is a daughter of Daniel Frost, who was a prominent lawyer, and died in Canterbury in 1863, aged 76 years. He was the son of Daniel Frost. His mother was the youngest daughter of John Clark, who it is said, established the first button factory in America, he having learned the trade in England. He died at the remarkable age of 101 years in Canterbury. Helen L. married Anderson S. Dean in 1843. He died in 1352, leaving two children-Anderson E. and Jennie L. She married for her second husband Hezekiah L. Danielson in 1870. He was the son of James, and a descendant of the original James Danielson. He was a farmer, and died in 1881. By a former marriage he had several children.

Samuel D. Danielson was born in 1838 in Killingly. He is a son of Adam B. Danielson. His grandparents were Samuel Danielson and a daughter of Adam Begg, who came from Scotland and settled where Simeon Danielson now lives. Mr. Danielson was brought up a farmer. He was a dry goods salesman seven years, then after a few years he was in the furniture store of Edward Dexter about six years. He is now collector for the sewing machine company in Danielsonville. He was married in 1867 to S. Ellen, daughter of Abel Kennedy. They had two daughters-Mary L., who is now a student at Wellesley College, and Hattie K., who died aged two years. Mrs. Danielson died in September, 1885. He was married again in October, 1886, to Mrs. Amelia F. Alexander, daughter of Francis-F. Young. She has two children by a former marriage.

Simeon Danielson was born in 1840 in Killingly. He is a son of Adam B., and grandson of Samuel, whose father Samuel, was a son of Samuel, and grandson of James Danielson. Adam B. was a deacon in the Congregational church of Westfield from 1828 to 1872. He was the father of seven children, three of whom are living. Simeon Danielson was a teacher for twelve years. Since that he has been a farmer. He was `married in March, 1883, to Mary C. Harris of Michigan. They have two daughters-Ada E. and Florence H. Mr. Danielson is a republican, and a member of the Congregational church of Westfield.

George R. Davis, son of Randall and Philura (Kies) Davis, was born in 1831 in Killingly, Conn., and is one of nine children, seven of whom are living. Randall Davis bought the farm where George R. now lives of Jonathan Cutler in 1836, and built the present dwelling in 1842. Mr. Davis has been selectman four years as a democrat. He was married in 1864 to Betsey S., daughter of Dyer and Minerva (Durfee) Warren. They have two children-Frank A. and Minnie M.

Herbert Day, born in 1823, is a son of Captain John Day and grandson of John Day, who, with William Alexander, built the first mill at Dayville. His mother was Sarah Ann, daughter of Joseph Dexter. Of their five children there are only two living-Albert and Herbert. Mr. Day was a farmer prior to 1868, and since that time he has lived in Danielsonville. He was married in 1861 to Ellen, daughter of William N. Millard. They have three children. Mrs. Day died in 1870. Mr. Day was married again in 1878 to Lucy Gague. John Day was a soldier in the war of 1812.

Walter F. Day, born in March, 1849, in Killingly, is a son of Colonel Luther Day and grandson of John Day. His mother was Emily Fisher. She was married to Mr. Day in 1840. They had four children: Waterman A. and Walter B., deceased, and Eliza P. (Mrs. John M. Brown) and Walter F., who is a farmer, occupying the farm where his father and grandfather both lived. He runs a milk route to Dayville and Elmville. He has a farm of 200 acres. He has been on the board of relief two years. He was married in 1879 to Carrie, daughter of Julius Rood. They have four children: Carrie E., Mary E., Luther W. and Arthur L. Colonel Luther Day died in April, 1881, aged 81 years.

Edward Dexter, son of Jonathan and grandson of Joseph Dexter, was born in 1831 in Killingly, Conn. He was a farmer until 37 years of age. About 1868 he bought the furniture and house furnishing business of George Bates; in 1876 the undertaking business was added, and in 1886 he put in a carpet department. He built what is known as the Dexter Block in 1881, and since that time his business has been at its present location. He was married in 1864 to Margaret, daughter of George Clark. He is a member of the Westfield Congregational church and a republican.

Horace A. Dixon, born in 1839, in Providence, R. I., is a son of Horace and grandson of Charles Dixon. His mother was Martha M., daughter of Brinton Arnold. Mr. Dixon came to Connecticut when a lad. In 1862 he enlisted in Company E, 5th Connecticut volunteers, and served his country until the close of the war. In 1869 he came to Danielsonville, working in the machine shop of the Quinebaug Manufacturing Company about five years, since which time he has been overseer of the machine shop of the Danielsonville Cotton Company. He was married in 1868 to Harriet E., daughter of John Lily. They have one son, Walter L. Mr. Dixon is a member of McGregor Post, No. 27, G. A. R., and a member of Orient Lodge, No. 37, K. of P. He is, a republican.

M. P. Dowe, born in 1835 in Providence, R. I., is a son of Amasa, and grandson of Amasa Dowe. He came to Danielsonville in 1845. In 1854 he went into the jewelry store with his father, learning the jeweler's trade. In 1860 he established a book, stationery and news business. In 1873 he bought the store and moved his business to its present location. In 1874 he added woolen and worsted yarns to his stock. In 1883 the firm of M. P. Dowe & Sons was established, and the business is carried on under that name at the present time. Mr. Dow e has been a member of the board of education several terms and has been warden, clerk and treasurer of the borough. He was appointed postmaster in January, 1887. He is a democrat. He has had the telephone office since the Danielsonville division was built in 1882. He was married in 1856 to Emily A. Davis. They have two sons: John M. and Charles A.

Almond N. Durfee was born November 16th, 1840. He is a son of Horace, who was born in 1813, and died in 1886. The latter was a son of Abner, whose father was Captain William Durfee, who was a sea captain in early life, and lived in Newport county, R. I. He emigrated to Killingly, and purchased a large tract of land on Chestnut hill, and a part of that same land is the farm where Mr. Durfee now lives, and which is owned by Miss Sarah C. Durfee of Providence, R. I. Mr. Durfee was married October 17th, 1868, to Ann Dagnan. They have one daughter, Ellen Edna. Mr. Durfee is a democrat.

Melvin E. Fisher was born in 1843 in Woodstock, Conn. He is the only son of Lucius B., and grandson of Alcott and Mary (Jackson) Fisher. His mother was Emily, daughter of Jonathan and Sarah (Smith) Howard, daughter of Daniel Smith. Mr. Fisher has been a carpenter for the past twenty years in Danielsonville. He built his residence on Hutchins street in 1882. He was married in 1870, to Amy, daughter of Leonard Chaffee. They have one daughter, Grace E.

Erastus E. Fiske, son of Peleg and Eliza (Henry) Fiske, was born in 1836 in Killingly, and is a farmer. He served in Company K, 18th Connecticut volunteers, from August, 1862, until June, 1865. He was married in 1859 to Lydia J. Butman; who died in 1867. He was married again in 1871 to Mary J., daughter of Thomas Dexter, and granddaughter of Thomas Dexter. Their children are: Charles A., Walter R., Ella J. and Ida May. Mr. Fiske is a republican and a member of the Free Will Baptist church.

Isaac Fogg, son of Luther and Nancy Fogg, was born in 1818, in Maine, and is a carpenter by trade. In 1851 he came to East Killingly, where he has since lived. He represented this town in the legislature in 1862 and 1864. He was postmaster at East Killingly about sixteen years prior to October, 1885. He was married in 1842 to Hannah A., daughter of George A. and Lucy (Mastcraft) Columbus. They had one son, Henry M., who died in infancy.

Calvin H. Frisbie, son of William Frisbie, was born in 1862 in Connecticut. He finished his education in Norwich, in 1869. He came to Attawaugan in 1869, where he learned the machinist's trade and was boss machinist for about four years. In 1879 he was made superintendent of the Attawaugan Manufacturing Company, which position he has since filled. He was married in 1879 to Marion, daughter of Lyman Taft, of Smithfield, R. I. They have three children: Hattie C., Henry L. and William R. Mr. Frisbie is a republican, a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M. and a member of Chapter and Council.

John W. Gallup was born in 1867 in Sterling, Conn. He is the oldest son of Ezra A., whose father, Daniel A., was a son of Esquire John Gallup. His mother was Olive (Knight) Gallup. He was educated at the public schools of Sterling and at the Plainfield Academy. He came to Danielsonville in August, 188 7, .and worked in the butcher and meat business for F. W. Medbery until December, 1888, when he bought the business.

Nathaniel S. Gallup, born in April, 1818, in Windham, is a son of Thomas, whose father, Nathaniel, was a son of Benjamin Gallup. His mother was Martha, daughter of Josiah Smith. Mr. Gallup is a farmer, although he has taught school twenty winters. He came from Voluntown to Killingly in 1875, and three years later he bought a small farm and put up the buildings where his residence now is. He represented the town of Voluntown one term, 1855, and was judge of probate and held other town offices. Since living here he has been selectman one term and on the school board two terms. He was married in 1851 to Mrs. Abbie White, daughter of Stephen S. Pierce, who was a son of Thomas Pierce, of Sterling. Mr. Gallup is a democrat. He lived in Voluntown from 1836 until 1875.

Patrick Gibbons, son of Thomas Gibbons, was born in Ireland in 1852, and came from Ireland to Wauregan, in the town of Plainfield, in 1853, where he lived until 1878. He worked eight years in the Wauregan store, going from there to Putnam, where he remained two years. In August, 1880, he established a general store at Chestnut hill, where he continued until March, 1884, when he moved the business to Killingly Centre., In August, 1888, he sold out to John and Peter Leyden. He was married in 1879 to Maria C. Leyden. They have three children: Minnie A., John T. and George E. He is a member of the Dayville Cath- olic church, and a member of John Lyon Lodge, No. 45, K. of P.

J. Charles Greene was born September 5th, 1833, in Smithfield, R. I. He is the youngest son of John C., and grandson of Job Greene. Mr. Greene spent his boyhood and youth in Millville, Mass., leaving there at the age of twenty-one. He lived three years in Pascoag, R. I., then one year in Putnam, Conn.; from there he went to Madison county, N. Y., where he was interested in woolen manufacturing, coming back to Putnam for a time, after which he came to Dayville, where he was boss finisher for the Sayles Manufacturing Company eight years. In 18S4 he bought a farm of 190 acres, which is one of four farms which comprised a school district at one time, namely, Danielson, Day, Dexter and Williams, called Between the Rivers " district, and making a school of thirty-six pupils. DIr. Greene was married in 1856 to Mary, daughter of Daniel Harris. They have two sons, Fred. H. and Walter S. They lost one son, Wilmer F.

Albert W. Greenslit, born in December, 1827, in Hampton, Conn., is a son of Ebenezer, who was in the war of 1812, and, grandson of John Greenslit. His mother -was Lucy Webb. In 1845 he came to Killingly from Hampton, where he has been engaged in cotton manufacturing almost constantly since that time. He was overseer of weaving about ten years, and on October 1st, 1863, he became superintendent of the Valley mills, which position he has filled since that time. He was married in 1848 to Patience M., daughter of Captain Otis Bastow, son of William Bastow. They have one son, Frederick A. He was a member of the legislature in 1876, and has held numerous town offices. He is a member of the Free Will Baptist church of East Killingly.

Eben Griffiths, born in 1823 in Plainfield, Conn., is a son of James Griffiths, who came from Foster, R. I., to Plainfield in 1820. His mother was Clarissa Hyde. Mr. Griffiths came to Danielsonville about 1842. He was engaged on repairs for A. D. Lockwood about seventeen years, in what is now the Quinebaug mill. He has had charge of repairs at the Danielsonville cotton mill since 1868. He built the residence on Maple street where he now lives in 1860. He was married in 1846 to Olive Handall. She died in 1884, leaving five children: Adaline E. (Mrs. Charles Hyde), Mary E. (Mrs. Albert Jordan), William H., Hortense E. and Clarence L. Mr. Griffiths was married again to Mrs. Mary Bitgood, daughter of Israel Pratt.

Henry H. Hammell, son of James Hammell, was born in 1830 in Manchester, England, and came to America when about fifteen years of age. Since 1851 he has been in the manufacturing business almost constantly. In 1859 he came to the Chestnut Hill mills as overseer of carding, and in 1860 was made superintendent. In 1865 he went to Rhode Island, where he remained until August, 1886. At that time he came back and has been superintendent since that time. He was married in 1852 to Mary Baldwin. She died in 1866, leaving one daughter, Emma. He was married in 1873 to Ruth Round. He is a member of the Baptist church, a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A M., and a republican.

Edward H. Hammett was born in 1856 in Plainfield, Conn. He is a son of Theodore, whose father, Erastus, was a son of Jonathan Hammett. Mr. Hammett was brought up on a farm until 1879, when he came to Danielsonville, where he worked for the Quinebaug Manufacturing Company eight years, and since that time he has been employed in the mill supplies shop of E. H. Jacobs & Co. - He was married in 1879 to Ida M., daughter of William Wood. They have two daughters-Myrtie E. and A. M. May. Mr. Hammett is a republican.

Erastus Hammett, born in 1824 in Plainfield, Conn., is a son of Erastus and grandson of Jonathan Hammett. His mother is Priscilla (Wilbur) Hammett. She is now 93 years old. Mr. Hammett was a farmer until 1873. At that time he built a house and moved to Danielsonville, where he was in the express business for nine years. He still owns and runs the old homestead of Jonathan Hammett in Plainfield. He was married in 1846 to Mary, daughter of Isaac Pike. They have four children Augustus L., Augusta L., Chauncey (deceased) and Frank I.

Theodore Hammett, born in 1820 in Plainfield, is a son of Erastus, and grandson of Jonathan Hammett, who came from Martha's Vineyard to Plainfield when a boy. He married Mehitabel Woodard. Erastus was married to Priscilla Wilbur. They had two sons, Theodore and Erastus. Jonathan Hammett was a representative several times, and selectman about twenty years in Plainfield. Theodore is a farmer, having a farm of 214 acres. He was married January 1st, 1850, to a daughter of Calvin Hubbard. They have had eight children: Theodore ' E., Edward H., Maria, Abbie M., Nellie L. and three that died- Olive, Carrie and Hattie.

Henry Hammond, born in 1814 in Pomfret, Conn., is a son of Eleazer, and grandson of Stephen Hammond. His mother was Ann M. (Brown) Hammond. Mr. Hammond came to Killingly in .1851. He was a member of the legislature in 1854 and again in 1865, and was state senator in 1881 and 1882. He was for several years trustee of the Windham County Savings Bank, and is now president of the First National Bank of Killingly. He was married in 1840 to Emma Dorrance. They have one daughter living, Harriet J. They lost two children-Charles Henry and Ella. Mr. Hammond has been a member of the Methodist church for about sixty years. He is a republican.

Mrs. Susan Hammond was a daughter of H. Peckham,= M. D., who was born in 1777 and died in 1837. He practiced medicine in East Killingly for many years. She was married November 25th, 1831, to Justin Hammond, M. D., who was born in 1804, entered Brown University in 1823, graduated from there in 1827, and received his degree of M. D. from Harvard in 1830, and immediately began practice in Killingly and continued until his death in 1873. He removed from East Killingly to Dayville in 1851, where his widow now lives. Doctor Hammond was a representative in the legislature two terms. He was a whig and later a republican. They had a family of eight children, three of whom are now living: Susan P., of Boston; Henry L., of Dayville, and Ellen F. (Mrs. S. M. Gladwin), of Hartford. Mrs. Hammond is a sister of the late F. H. Peckham, M. D., of Providence, R. I.

Charles S. Hawkins was born in 1818 in Killingly, Conn. He is a son of Arnold, and grandson of Joseph Hawkins, whose father was Moses Hawkins. His mother was Marcia, daughter of Daniel Spaulding. Mr. Hawkins has been a farmer. He built a large residence in Danielsonville in 1873, and two years later he retired from the farm and came here to live. He was married in 1851 to Lydia, daughter of Nathaniel Corey. He is a member of the Westfield Congregational church.

Edwin W. Hayward, son of Edward P. Hayward, was born in 1858 in Pomfret, Conn. He was in Putnam High School about four years. He came to Danielsonville in 1879, and in April of that year the firm of Durkee & Hayward was established, and they bought the tailor business of E. A. Finney, and added ready made clothing to the business, which was continued until March, 1886, when Mr. Hayward bought Mr. Durkee's interest,, and since that time has conducted the business alone. He was married in 1884 to Lizzie, daughter of John H. Stephens. They have one son, Julius S. Mr. Hayward is a member of the Congregational church, and a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F.& A. M.

Jeremiah Hill, born in 1827 in Plainfield, Conn., is a son of Daniel, whose father Edward Hill, came to Plainfield in 1779, and settled on a farm in the northeast part of the town, which is still in the Hill family. His mother was Abigail (Hall) Hill. Mr. Hill was a farmer in Plainfield until 1867, and at that time he came from there to Danielsonville, where he has done teaming. He was married in 1848 to Freelove Potter, who died in 1850. He was married again in 1851 to Abbie F., daughter of Samuel Bushnell. He is a member of the Congregational church of Westfield.

Mrs. A. Caroline Holbrook is a daughter of Jeremiah and Hannah (Angel) Field, granddaughter of Jeremiah and Lydia (Colwell) Field, and great-granddaughter of Jeremiah Field. She is one of twelve children, nine of whom are now living. She was married in 1860 to John K. Holbrook, born in 1804, in Pomfret, son of Judge John Holbrook. They came to Danielsonville in 1875, having built a residence in Westfield three years previous. He died at his home in 1885. Mrs. Holbrook and her sister Mrs. William S. Alexander, occupy the residence now.

Mathewson Hopkins, born in 1800 in Foster, R. I., is a son of Mathewson, and grandson of Nicholas Hopkins. His mother was Mary Tanner. Mr. Hopkins is a farmer, and came to Killingly from Rhode Island several years ago. He was married in 1820 to Mahala, daughter of Sampson Bennett. They have four children living: William, Darius, Thomas M. and Gilbert. His wife died died in 1872. He was married again in 1874 to Mrs. Sarah Sweet, daughter of Abel Tanner.

Mary Hovey is a daughter of Hollis, and granddaughter of Luther Butts. Daniel A. Hovey, M.D., was born in 1809, and in 1830 he began the practice of medicine in South Killingly, which he continued until his death in October, 1878. Although he had a large practice, he found time to represent the town one year in the legislature, and always took an interest in the politics of the town. He was a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M. He was married in 1859 to Mary Butts. They had five children: Marian B. W. (Mrs. George Briggs), Charles E. (deceased), Emeline E. (Mrs. William Miller), Jennie E. (Mrs. Merton Gardiner), and Charles A. (deceased).

Daniel S. Hubbard was born in 1819 in Plainfield, Conn. He is a son of Calvin Hubbard, who was ensign in the war of 1812. His father was a soldier in the war of the revolution. It is believed that his name was Calvin Hubbard. His mother's name was Olive, a daughter of Edward Hill. Mr. Hubbard is a farmer. He built a residence in the south part of the village of Danielsonville in 1861, where he now lives. He was married in 1846 to Lydia Ann Hale. She died in 1851. They had two children -Ida 0.. and Henry C., both deceased. He was married in 1872 to Mary, daughter of Samuel D. Baxter, son of Joseph' Baxter, whose father Robert, was a son of Thomas Baxter.

Thomas Hughes, son of Patrick Hughes, was born in 1837 in Ireland, and came to Connecticut when a lad. In 1.865 he went West, where he was a farmer for eighteen years, returning to Attawaugan in 1882, where he bought a farm and has since resided. He was married in 1864 to Honora Connor. They have six children: Thomas, James, Daniel, Joseph, Mary and Catharine. Mr. Hughes is a democrat and a member of Dayville Catholic church.

Charles D. James, born in 1845 at Baltic, Conn., is the adopted son of Charles and Lucy (Bushnell) James. He is a farmer. He came to Danielsonville in 1867, and bought the farm where he now lives. For the past five years he has been agent for farm implements and fertilizers. He was married in 1868 to Maria E., daughter of Theodore Hammett. They have seven children: Ida C., Robert R., Lucelia A., Everett, Lyndall, who died in infancy, Eulali E. and Carrie H. He is a spiritualist and a prohibitionist.

Rowland R. James, son of Alanson James, was born in 1838 in Cranston, R. I., and came to Killingly in 1855. He taught school about four years, and was in the war of the rebellion from August 9th, 1862, to July, 1865, in Company K, 18th Connecticut volunteers. He was clerk in a store for two years prior to July, 1867. At that time he, in company with his brother Newman W. James, under the firm name of James Brothers, bought the grocery business of S. Gleason, and five years later they bought the grocery and crockery business of Christopher Crandall, and moved to the Crandall Block, where they remained five years, and at the end of that time took possession of their present store. In 1883 the firm was dissolved, and since that time it has been R. R. James. Mr. James married in 1866 Olive A. Steere, and has two children-Albert L. and Grace E.

George Jencks was born in 1854. He is a son of Leavens, who was born in 1810, and married Esther Kelly. Four of their six children are now living: Dewitt C. E., Frances, Lucia G. and George, who was bookkeeper for H. & S. Sayles two years at Dayville. Leaving there in 1879, he came to Danielsonville, where he has kept a hardware store since that time. The firm was George Jencks & Co. until September, 1887, since then Jencks & Franklin. He has been warden of the borough one term, in the court of burgesses several terms, and justice five years. He was married to Lucy B. Potter. They have three children: Anna E., William L. and Mildred P. He is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M., and is a member of the Congregational church. He is a republican. Leavens Jencks was the first station agent at Dayville, was postmaster there for several years, and also judge of probate. He was a merchant.

Hiram M. Jencks, son of James Jencks, was born in 1842 in Slatersville, R. I. He was superintendent of a mill at Arkwright, R. I., seven years. From there he went to Rehoboth, Mass., where he was interested. in manufacturing for three years. He came from there to East Killingly in 1884, where he keNt a general store for six months, removing the business to Dayville in April, 1885, where he still keeps a general store. He is a member of Assawaga Lodge, No. 20, A. O. U. W., and a member of the Masonic fraternity.

Daniel H. Johnson, born in 1836 in Coventry, R. I., is a son of Henry, and grandson of George Johnson, who was a soldier in the revolutionary war. His mother was Lydia Minerva, daughter of Captain Samuel Cady. Mr. Johnson was brought up a farmer and brick maker, but has worked at the carpenter's trade since 1861. In 1866 he came to Danielsonville from Brooklyn, Conn., and seven years later he built the residence on Reynolds street, where he has since lived. He was married in 1866 to Hannah Maria, daughter of Charles A. Stone of West Greenwich, R. I. He is a republican.

John Kelly was born September 18th, 1821. William Kelly was born in Rhode Island in 1747, came to Killingly in 1789, served in the revolution, and died in 1831. His son Ebenezer was born in 1780, was in the war of 1812, and died in 1864. His wife was Esther, daughter of Nell Alexander. Their youngest son, John, was born in Killingly. He has been in the wood and lumber business for several years. He was in the legislature in 1867 and 1877, and has held several town offices. He has been county commissioner since July, 1886. He was married in 1842 to Eliza A., daughter of Norman Curtiss. They have six children: Helen, Norman H., William P., Mary (deceased), and and George S. and Mary Jane (deceased). Mr. Kelly is a member of Marvin Waite Post, No. 51, G. A. R., a member of the Congregational church, and a republican.

William P. Kelley, son of Hon. John Kelly, was born "in 1848 in Killingly. He was in a general store at Versailles, Conn., for three years, and while there was postmaster, and filled other offices. He came to Dayville in 1882, where he kept a general store for about four years, and in March, 1886, he bought the store of M. & A. Wood in Dayville, and consolidated the two stores. He was married in 1876 to Anna, daughter of Reverend A. H. Bennett. They have three children: John B., Mary E. and Helen M. Mr. Kelley has held several town offices, and in 1887 represented the town in the legislature. He is a member of John Lyon Lodge, No. 45, K. of P., and of Assawaga Lodge, N o. 20, A. 0. U. W. He was in the war of the rebellion.

Lorenzo M. Kennedy, born in 1828 in Foster, R. I., is the seventh son of George, who was the youngest son of Alexander Kennedy. His mother was Selinda Parker. Mr. Kennedy came from Rhode Island tc Killingly in 1846. He learned the carpenter's trade, but only followed it a few years. He kept a store for several years. He came to Dayville in. March, 1866, and the same year bought the Dayville Hotel, which he managed with livery and sale stable attached until December, 1888, when he sold the business to his son, Frank S. Mr. Kennedy now lives on his farm at Ballouville. He was married in 1851 to Jane Kies. They have four children: Charles P., Frank S., Will L. and Nathan W. He is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M.

Frank S. Kennedy, son of Lorenzo M., was born in 1853 in Killingly, Conn. He bought the undertaking establishment of Mowry Amsbury in 1880, and has carried on the business since that time. He was in a market for some time with his brother and father, as mentioned above, and now is a partner in a general store with his brother, Will L. Kennedy. He bought his father's interest in the hotel and livery stable at Dayville in December, 1888. He was married in 1880 to Ada, daughter of Oscar Amsbury. They have one daughter, Ida Jane. He is a member of Assawaga Lodge, No. 20, A. O. U. W.

Will L. Kennedy, son of Lorenzo M., was born in 1858 in Killingly. He was clerk in the store of M. & A. Wood for, three years, then in company with his father and brother kept a market at Dayville three years (firm of L. M. Kennedy & Sons). In October, 1886,, a partnership between Mr. Kennedy and his brother, Frank S., was formed, and a general store was established at Dayville, which they now run. He was married in 1879 to Susan Two good, who died in 1882, leaving two daughters, Cora L. and Mary Jane. He was married again in February, 1885, to Alice C., daughter of John Turner. They have one son, Thomas H. Mr. Kennedy is a member 'of John Lyon Lodge, No. 45, K. of P.

Otis E. Keith was-born in 1829 in Thompson, Conn. He is the only son of Captain Joseph D., who was the oldest son of Eleazer Keith, who was lieutenant in the war of 1812. His wife was Kelita Tyler. His father was lost in the revolutionary war, after which Eleazer was adopted by Joseph Demmon, of Massachusetts, who removed later to Thompson. The mother of Otis E. was Lucy, daughter of Silas Bundy, whose father, Ebenezer, once owned a large tract of land, including the mill privilege where the Putnam Manufacturing Company is now located. Mr. Keith is a farmer. He has been president of the Putnam Cemetery Association for six years. He was married in 1859 to Elizabeth Rowland, who died in 1879, leaving one son, Luther M. He was married August 16th, 1880, to Sarah M., daughter of Ezra Howard. They have one daughter, Abbie H. Mr. Keith is a staunch prohibitionist and a member of the Attawaugan Methodist Episcopal church.

Ann Kershaw is a daughter of John and Phoebe (Gregory) Stokes. She was married in 1859 to Robert Kershaw, son of William. Mr. Kershaw was a mill operative and mill superintendent at Burrillville. In 1884, in company with two others, he rented a mill in Burrillville, which they operated until 1886, when Mr. Kershaw retired on account of ill health. He built a residence in Dayville in 1875, where he died in October, 1886, aged 57 years. He was a member of the Masonic order.

Fannie H. Kies, born in Coventry, R. I., is a daughter of Clark and Eunice (Matteson) Cornell. She was married in 1855 to George Kies, a son of Harris and Sarah Ann (Goodspeed) Kies, and a grandson of William Kies. Mr. Kies was a house carpenter by trade. He enlisted in 1862 as second lieutenant in Company K, 18th Connecticut volunteers, and served until the close of the war. He was promoted to first lieutenant during that time. He died in 1872. They have one son living, Walter E. They lost three children: Lenora A., Leroy E. and Victoria G.

Henry V. Lathrop, born April 9th, 1851, in Norwich, Conn., is a son of Richard S., and grandson of Septimus Lathrop, who was the seventh generation from Reverend John Lathrop, who was educated at Queens College, Cambridge, where he graduated in 1609. His mother was Jane F., daughter of Festus and Eliza Thompson. She died July 7th, 1857, leaving two children, Mary E. and Henry Vaughn. The latter was educated at the public and select schools of Plainfield. He has been engaged in reed manufacturing in Danielsonville since February, 1869. In November, 1870, R. S. Lathrop bought the reed business here, and from that time until his death in May, 1882, Henry V. worked with his father, but since that time he has been manager of the business. He is a prohibitionist. He has been two years in the court of burgesses. He was married October 5th, 1875, to Mary H., daughter of William M. and Elizabeth (Shepard) Johnson. They have three children: Frank E., J. Bessie and Claribel A. Mr. Lathrop is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M., and a member of the Westfield Congregational church. Mrs. Lathrop is a member of the Baptist church of Danielsonville. She is president of the local W. C. T. U.

George H. Law, born in 1816 in Killingly, is the eldest son of Jeremiah, whose father, George, was a son of George Law. His mother was Hepsibeth, daughter of Ebenezer Leach. Jeremiah Law was born in 1796, was member of the legislature one term and selectman several terms as a democrat, was the father of seven children, and died in 1876. George H. went from Chestnut hill to Rhode Island at the age of seventeen, where he was engaged in cotton manufacturing for twenty-two years. In 1870 he bought the farm where he now resides, and since that time has been a farmer. He represented the town in the legislature two terms, in 1881 and 1883, as a republican. He was married in 1839 to Clarinda. daughter of Joseph Clark. They have eight children: Jennie (Mrs. C. T. Westcott), George, Sarah Ellen (Mrs. C. G. Mowry), Clara, Carrie (Mrs. E. Jencks), Emma, Joseph and Charles F. George was in the war of the rebellion, 3d Rhode Island Cavalry. '

John W. Law was born in 1855 in Killingly. He is a son of Parris M., son of William, son of George, son of George, son of David Law. His mother was Emily (Perry) Law. Mr. Law began as clerk in the Williamsville store in 1876, where he has been since that time.

James K. Logee, son of Elisha Logee, is a baker by trade. In 1840 John Sparks established a bakery where the Central Hotel now stands in Danielsonville. In 1843 he sold the business to James K. Logee, who continued it at the same place until 1860. At that time he built a bakery in Westfield, which burned in February, 1879. It was rebuilt the same year, and since that time the business has been pastry baking; prior to that time it was a cracker factory. He was married in 1844 to Julia N., daughter of John Sparks. They had three sons: James E.. William K. and Henry F. His wife died in 1858, and he was married in 1859 to Hannah H. Bruce. She died in 1877, leaving one daughter, Mary S. (Mrs. J. E. F. Brown). He was married in 1881 to Mary Chadwick Babson.

James E. Logee, son of James K. and Julia N. (Sparks) Logee, was born March 6th, 1845. He was brought up a baker, and in 1866 took an interest in the baking business with his father, and since that time they have carried on the business together. He was married in 1866 to Ada S. Tucker, who died one year later. He was married in 1873 to Lucy A., daughter of David B. Wheaton. They have two children: Arthur W. and Lucy T. Mr. Logee is a republican.

Calvin B. Long, born in 1837 in Canterbury, Conn., is a son of William, and grandson of David Long. His mother was Lucy Varnum. Mr. Long came to Danielsonville in 1869, and about four years later bought a blacksmith shop, which he has since operated. He was married in 1857 to Sarah, daughter of David Monroe. Their children are: William Henry, Jennie (Mrs. George Baker), and George. Mr. Long is a democrat. He served about three months in the war of the rebellion in the 3d Connecticut volunteers.

John Mahrs was born in Dublin, Ireland, and came to Massachusetts at the age of four years with his father, John Mahrs. He came to Danielsonville in March, 1858. He is a shoemaker by trade. He was appointed sexton of the Westfield Cemetery in 1877, and built the house where he now lives in 1869. Mr. Mahrs was married January 3d, 1848, to Eliza E., daughter of Waldo Parkhurst. Their children are: Lora J., now Mrs. P. H. Sprague; Susan E., now Mrs. W. K. Logee; John W. and Charlotte H., now Mrs. Henry Thompson. Mr. Mahrs is a prohibitionist. His wife is a member of the Congregational church.

William H. Marland, son of James Marland, was born in England, and came to Killingly in 1881. In 1882 he went back to England, returning again in 1884, and since that time he has been employed in the lumber yards of John A. Paine. He owns a residence on Maple street, known as " the Twin Cottages." He was married in January, 1882, to Hannah King. They have three children: Rupert K., Myrtie E. and Sidney P. They lost one son, Earl. Mr. Marland is a member of Danielsonville Episcopal church, and a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M.

Charles Mason, born in 1841, is a son of David, whose father Shubael, was a son of Peletiah Mason, whose wife was Sarah Allen. His mother is Lucy (Bowen) Mason. Shubael Mason's wife was Nancy Law. David and Lucy Mason had eight children: Israel B., George L. (deceased), Erastus (deceased), Maria F. (deceased), Charles, David A. (deceased), Emily L. (deceased), and William Henry. Charles has been a merchant for a number of years in Providence and other places. For the past few years he has had no business except a little farming. He was married in 1864 to Mary Crabtree, who died the year following. He married in 1868 Mrs. Abbie F. Rice, a daughter of W. R. and Chloe Lillibridge, of Exeter, R. I.

Lucy A. Mason is a daughter of Rufus and Susanna (Round) Simmons. She was married November 16th, 1861, to George L. Mason, son of David and Lucy Mason. He died leaving two daughters-Abbie F. (Mrs. E. M. Young), and Harriet E., who married F. Smith, son of James and Mary Ann (Williams) Smith. He was born in 1856, and works at carding in the Whitestone cotton mills.

William Mathewson was born December 22d, 1825. He is a son of Mason, and grandson of Royal Mathewson, whose wife was Hepsibeth Mason. His ;mother was Margaret Taft. Mr. Mathewson is a farmer. He was married September 14th, 1851, to Mary hl., daughter of David and Elizabeth Graves; and has one son, William T.

Frank W. Medbery, born in 1857, in Plainfield, Conn., is a son of Nathaniel, whose father Nathaniel, was a son of Nathaniel Medbery. His mother is Susan F., daughter of Sabin L. Hawkins. Mr. Medbery worked in the market of the Wauregan Company at Wauregan eight years. In November, 1881, he bought the meat business of J. P. Dexter in Danielsonville, which he enlarged, until now he keeps a full line of meats and canned goods, doing a business of about $1,500 per month. He was married in 1878 to Nellie J. Johnson.

Esquare B. Miller was born in August, 1827, in Killingly, Conn. He is a son of Welcome and grandson of Peter Miller, whose father was a preacher. His mother was Elsie (Bartlett) Miller. Mr. Miller was a farmer with his father until 1859, and since that time he has been a carpenter. He came to Dayville in 1861 and for fifteen years worked on repairs, both wood and iron, for S. & H. Sayles. Since that time he has been a contractor and builder. He was selectman and clerk of the board for twelve years in succession. He was married in 1846 to Sarah H., daughter of Ephriam Warren. She died in May, 1887, leaving five boys: Chauncy T., Esquare J., Henry J., Everett E. and Fred. L. They lost one in infancy, Daniel W. Mr. Miller is a republican, a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M., and also a member of the Chapter and Council.

Frank Mitchell was born in 1837 in Killingly, Conn. He is the oldest son of Ezekiel, son of Abraham, son of Ezekiel, son of Experience Mitchell, who came from England to Massachusetts in 1649, and whose son, Ezekiel, came to Killingly about 1768. Mr. Mitchell has worked in cotton mills since he was eight and one-half years old, with the exception of five years which he spent in California. He was overseer of weaving at Packerville eleven years. Since August, 1875, he has been superintendent for the Whitestone Manufacturing Company. He was married in 1865 to Susan G. Aynesworth, who died in July, 1875, leaving one daughter, Alice. Mr. Mitchell is a republican.

Orrin D. Mitchell, born in 1819 in Killingly, is a son of Lott and grandson of William Mitchell. His mother was Celinda Martin. He runs a grist mill on the Whetstone brook, between Killingly Centre and East Killingly, where his father owned a grist and saw mill for many years. He was married in 1845 to Phebe, daughter of Joseph Hammond. They have four children living: Wesley, Deloss, Oliva and Adelbert. They have lost three: Marcus E., Lovina and Celinda.

Luke Monahan, son of Thomas Monahan, was born in Ireland, came to America in 1850 and one year later came to Almyville, in Plainfield, where he remained until 1879, and for the last five years there he was boss farmer. In May, 1879, he came to Danielsonville, where he has since been overseer of general outdoor work for the Danielsonville Manufacturing Company. He married Ann Hughes and they have six children: Thomas, Michael, Mary, Bridget, James and Nellie.

William A. Newton was born in 1834 in Thompson, Conn., and has resided in Killingly since 1840. In 1859 he opened a store at East Killingly, and continued there until 1862, when he fitted up a store, and moved his business to the valley, one mile west, where he has since remained. He was married in 1854 to Abbie Mowry. She died in 1870, leaving two children, Melissa and Jennie. He was married in 1871 to Esther Gibson, daughter of Ira Gibson of Sterling. He is a democrat.

Joseph Oatley, born in 1816 in South Kingstown, R. I., is a son of Reverend Jonathan, whose father, Joseph, was a son of Jonathan Oatley, who came from England to Rhode Island in 1642. His mother was Amy, daughter of Joseph and Nancy Champlin. He came from South Kingstown with his father to East Killingly in 1834. He is a stone cutter by trade, although he worked in cotton mills several years when a young man. In 1843 he bought a granite ledge which he has worked since that time. He was married in 1838 to Cyntha, daughter of Moses and Sally Taft. They have five children: George W., Edward R., Joseph F., Sarah E. and Alice. Mr. Oatley is a democrat, and has been a member of East Killingly Baptist church for forty-five years.

William H. Oatley, born-in 1824 in South Kingstown, R. I., is a son of Reverend Jonathan Oatley. He has been working at cotton manufacturing since boyhood. Since November, 1877, he has been night watchman in Ross' Mill. He has been justice of the peace twenty years in succession, and registrar of voters since 1872. He represented the town in the legislature of 1872 as a republican. He has been twice married, but has no children. He has been a member of the East Killingly Baptist church since 1838, is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M., also a member of the Chapter and Council, and a member of Marvin Waite Post, No. 51, G. A. R. He was in the war of the rebellion in Company K, 7th Connecticut volunteers from September, 1861, to August 1865; was made . drum-major in February, 1862, which rank he filled until the close of the war.

Charles Paine, born in Killingly, is the eldest son of Lewis Paine and grandson of Joseph Paine. His mother is Lillis, daughter of William Hopkins and granddaughter of Barnett Hopkins. Mr. Paine is a farmer, and with his brother, Frederick A., runs the farm of his father. Since April, 1885, they have run a milk route in Danielsonville. They take great pride in their stock and fowls, which are of the best.

Frederick A. Paine, born in Killingly, is the youngest son of Lewis and Lillis (Hopkins) Paine, and grandson of Joseph and Drusilla (Hopkins) Paine. Mr. Paine's father was in California from 1850 to 1854. In 1857 he bought the farm of 200 acres where he lived until his death in April, 1877, and since that time the two sons have run the farm. Mr. Paine is a fancier of fine stock and poultry, of which he has some thoroughbred specimens. Mr. Paine's father was married in 1855 to Lillis Hopkins, and they had three sons: Charles, William H., who died in 1.877, and Frederick A.

Christopher Paine was born in 1816 in Foster, R. I. His father, Joseph Paine, came to Killingly from Rhode Island in 1822. His wife was Drusilla, daughter of Barnett Hopkins. Mr. Paine is the only survivor of a large family. He bought the farm which he now owns in 1848, and twelve years later built the house where he now lives. He was married in 1843 to Miranda, daughter of William Hopkins. They have five children living: Harriet, John, Maria, Alzaida and George. Mr. Paine is a republican, and a member of the Advent church.

James A. Paine, born in 1834 in Massachusetts, is the youngest son of Ransom and grandson of Benjamin Paine. He came to East Killingly in 1857, where he kept a store for about four years, after which time he established a slipper manufactory, which he conducted about three years. He then sold the business and bought, in 1864, the store of A. M. Paine, which he has run since that time with the exception of three years. He was married in 1861 to Mariette Mathews. They have two sons, James M. and Almond M. In politics Mr. Paine is a republican.

John A. Paine, born in 1850 in Woodstock, Conn., is a son of Martin and grandson of Cyril Paine. His mother was Lucia. daughter of Amos Perrin. Mr. Paine was bookkeeper and salesman for John 0. Fox & Co., of Putnam, about five years. In 1877 he came to Danielsonville and in company with John Davenport bought the-coal, lumber, fertilizer and builders' supplies business of 0. M. Capron & Son. In 1880 the partnership was dissolved and the business divided, Mr. Davenport taking the coal business and Mr. Paine keeping the balance, which he still continues. He was married in 1882 to Fanny, daughter of Charles Dorrance. They have three sons: Everett A., Arthur R. and Wallace M. He is a member of the Congregational church and a republican.

Edwin L. Palmer; born in 1847 in Griswold, Conn., is a son of Asher and Joanna (Ames) Palmer. Asher was in the war of 1812. Mr. Palmer established an insurance and real estate agency in Danielsonville in 1875, which he continued until 1886. In September of that year he sold the insurance business to S. W. Crofut, and since that time he has paid all his attention to real estate and western land securities. He is secretary of the Danielsonville board of trade and was clerk of the borough from 1880 to 1887. He was married in 1871 to Phoebe A. Keach, who died in 1873. He was married in 1880 to Ella M. Kennedy. They have three children: Harry E., Gladdis J. and Charlotte. He is a member of the Congregational church and superintendent of the Sunday school. He is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M., Warren Chapter, No. 12, and Montgomery Council, No. 2.

Joshua Perkins was born in Lisbon, Conn. He is a son of Charles, son of Joshua, son of Matthew, son of Joseph, son of John, son of John Perkins. His mother was Betsey Payne. Mr. Perkins began to learn dentistry about 1857, and came to Danielsonville in 1863, where he has since practiced. He has control of the state for an electric vibrator for extracting teeth. He was elected warden of the borough of Danielsonville in 1884, 1885 and 1886. He was a delegate to the democratic national convention in Chicago in 1884.

Charles Phillips, born February, 1848, is a son of Charles .Phillips, who was a cotton manufacturer. Mr. Phillips was educated at the schools of Douglass, Mass. He was head clerk in a store in Sutton, Mass., for nine years, then had charge of one of the stores of B. B. & R. Knight in Rhode Island for one year, coming from there in the spring of 1875 to Danielsonville, where he has had general charge of the store and grist mill of the Quinebaug Manufacturing Company since that time. He has been several years a member of the court of burgesses in the borough of Danielsonville. He was married in April, 1868, to Sarah M., daughter of Benjamin Abbott. They have two boys: Charles A. and William A. Mr. Phillips is a republican. He has been deacon of the Westfield Congregational church since March, 1888.

Christopher C. Pilling, born in 1848, in Smithfield, R. I., is a son of Reuben Pilling, who came from England about 1844. His mother was Ann Withington. Mr.. Pilling began learning the carpenter's trade at the age of sixteen, and with the exception of three years which he devoted to painting, he has followed that business as a contractor and builder. He was married in June, 1873, to Ellen M., daughter of Joseph Wheaton. They have one daughter, Maud W:, and one that died, Bertha M. Mr. Pilling is a deacon in the Baptist church here, and has acted in several official capacities in the church, and also in the Sunday school. He is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M.

Albert S. Potter, son of Asa Potter, was born in 1815 in Thompson, Conn. His mother is Ruth, daughter of Edward Stafford. Mr. Potter worked at cotton manufacturing for several years. In 1870 he came to Dayville, and since 1875 has. been boss farmer for the Sabin L. Sayles Manufacturing Company.. He was married in 1838 to Eliza, daughter of Nathan Young. They had four children: Emily A. (Mrs. Samuel Cogswell), Alonzo A., Frank W. (deceased), and one that died in infancy. His Rife died in 1852. He was married again in 1859 to Mrs. Almira Sweet, daughter of Leonard Williams. She has practiced medicine for several years.

Alfred Potter, son of Olney E., and grandson of William Potter, was born in 1823 in Foster, R. I. His mother was Orra (Cole) Potter. Mr. Potter came from Rhode Island to Killingly in 1848. He worked in the woolen mill of H. and S. Sayles about ten years. Then in company with Warren Potter, under the firm name of A. & W. Potter, he bought the Elmville mill property, which was built by Jonathan and Marvin Dexter, and operated the same until August, 1874, when the mill was destroyed by fire. The same year the brick mill was built in its place, and the manufacture of fancy cassimeres was continued until 1883. The property was sold in 1886 to C. D. & C. S. Chase, and since that time Mr. Potter has been a farmer. He was married in 1860 to Maria, daughter of Stephen S. Pierce, who was a son of Thomas Pierce. Mr. Potter built his present residence in 1872.

Alonzo B. Potter was born in 1832 in Scituate, R. I. He is a son of Robert N., son of Robert, son of Moses, son of Robert, son of Ralph, whose father John was a son of Robert Potter, who came to Rhode Island in 1630 and died in 1661. Mr. Potter came from Rhode Island to Killingly in 1849 with his father, who was a spool and bobbin manufacturer in Williamsville from that time until his death, April 26th, 1878. He had charge of a store at Dayville two years, 1856-7, then was a farmer until August, 1862, when he enlisted. in Company K, 18th Connecticut volunteers, serving until July, 1865. Since that time he has been a farmer, with the exception of five years, when he had charge of the Williamsville store. He was married in 1854 to Lucy A., daughter of Lawton Wade. They have one daughter, Alice J. (Mrs. F. W. Young, of Providence). Mr. Potter is a republican, and a member of Williamsville Congregational church.

Minnie N. Potter is a daughter of Robert Nelson and Rhoda (Parker) Potter, the latter a daughter of Joseph Parker. She is a sister of Alonzo B. Potter, mentioned above. Miss Potter lives in the house where her father lived from 1849 until his death in 1878. Her mother died in August, 1887. Robert N. Potter was a captain in the Dorr rebellion of Rhode Island, and afterward was made colonel in the state militia.

Charles T. Preston was born in 1848 in Killingly, Conn. He is a son of Charles, born in 1804, son of Levi, son of Daniel, a son of Levi Preston, who was a Scotchman. His mother is Eliza A., daughter of George Tyler. Charles T. is a house painter by trade. He was on the board of assessors two terms, and represented the town in the general assembly in 1884 as a democrat. Mr. Preston's father was married to Eliza A. Tyler. They have three children living: Lamira, Emeline F. and Charles T. Mr. Preston is a farmer. He lives on the Spaulding homestead on " Horse Hill." He taught school several terms when a young man. He was representative in 1846, and has been justice and selectman.

Frank T. Preston, son of Enos L. Preston, was born in 1853 in Brooklyn. He is a jeweler and watchmaker by trade. He came to this town in 1879, and November 3d, 1881, the firm of Preston & Carpenter was established. They bought the business of Amasa Dowe, which they still conduct. Mr. Preston was elected town treasurer October 5th, 1885, and on the 22d of the same month was appointed town clerk, which offices he has held since that time. He is president of the People's Library Association, treasurer of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M., Warren Chapter, No. 12, and of Montgomery Council, No. 2. He was married in 1885 to F. Myrtie Chase. They have one daughter, Florence C. Mr. Preston is a member of the Baptist church, a deacon, and superintendent of the Sunday school.

Albert D. Putnam, born in 1852 in Brooklyn, Conn., is a son of William H. Putnam, and is the fourth generation removed from General Putnam. Mr. Putnam's early education was in the schools of Brooklyn and Danielsonville, and later he attended the state Normal school. He taught school for eight consecutive winters. He was a farmer until 1858, and since that time has lived in Danielsonville, where he intends to engage in mercantile business as soon as his health will permit. He was married in December, 1876, to Harriet, daughter of Charles and Janette (Sharp) Dorrance. They have three children: William H., Sarah J. and Eliza D. Mr. Putnam is a member of the Episcopal church, a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M., and a member of Brooklyn Grange, No. 43, P. of H.

Royal C. Rawson, born in 1850 in Brooklyn, Conn., is a son of Daniel C., and grandson of Reverend Nathaniel Rawson. His mother is Eliza Copeland. Mr. Rawson is a farmer. He came to Danielsonville in December, 1877, where he runs a milk route. He was married January 1st, 1878, to Emily Martin, and has two sons-George R. and Walter A. He is a member of the Congregational church and a republican.

Nelson M. Reynolds, born in 1833 in Glocester, R. I., is a son of Orrin, and grandson of James Reynolds. He is a mason by trade. In September, 186S, he established a general store at East Killingly, which he still operates. He has been postmaster at East Killingly since October, 1885, has been assessor, member of the board of relief, selectman, and registrar of voters. He is a democrat. He was married January' 1st, 1857, to Julia A., daughter of John White.

Arnold P. Rich was born in 1858 in Killingly. He is a son of Alfred, whose father, Rufus, was a son of David Rich. His mother was Alma A., daughter of Mowry P. Arnold, M. D. He was educated at the schools of East Killingly and Danielsonville, and has taught school continuously since 1881. He was married in 1885 to Emma L., daughter of Charles A. Potter, son of Stephen H. Potter. Her mother is Phoebe A., daughter of Israel Chase. Mrs. Rich is also a teacher. Mr. Rich is a member of the Free Will Baptist church of East Killingly.

Sabin L. Sayles was born in Pascoag, R. I., February 8th, 1827. He is a son of Nicholas Sayles, who was for many years a manufacturer of farming implements in Pascoag, R. I. Mr. Sayles received only a common school education. He entered a woolen mill at the age of fifteen years, and about one year later entered his father's factory, where he served three years. He came to Killingly in 1853, and five years later to Dayville, where Mr. Say les' residence now is. Since being in Connecticut he has been connected with manufacturing, which is mentioned elsewhere. He was on the electoral ticket of Connecticut in 1864, and he was delegate to the national republican conventions of 1868 and 1872. In 1870 he was on Governor Jewell's staff with rank of colonel, and as a republican he has exerted a wide influence.

William H. Sayles, born March 10th, 1841, is a son of Harris C. Sayles, who, in company with A. Potter, took up a mill privilege west of Elmville, where a shoddy mill was built and run for a short time. Then Mr. Sayles bought Mr. Potter's interest and increased the business, and later began the manufacture of satinet goods. W. H. Sayles then took the business and conducted it about ten years, changing the production in the meantime from satinets to fancy cassimeres. Since 1880 he has rented the mill and machinery to T. E. Hopkins. He was married in 1863 to Phoebe S., daughter of James S. Cook, of Burrillville, R. I. They have two sons, James H. and Walter E. Mr. Sayles is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M., and a member of John Lyon Lodge, No. 45, K. of P.

Frank U. Scofield, born in Killingly in 1858, is a son of U. B. Scofield, who. came from New York to Killingly about thirty years ago. His mother is. Abbie J. Young. Mr. Scofield is a printer. He worked on The Transcript for J. Q. A. Stone nine years. Since March, 1882, he has been in the job printing business in Danielsonville. He built a residence on Cottage street in 1381, where he now resides. He has been steward in the Danielsonville Methodist Episcopal church four years, and Sunday school superintendent two years. He was married in 1882 to Ina W., daughter of Daniel Main. He is a member of AEtna Lodge, No. 21, A. O. U. W.

A. G. Scranton, born May 18th, 1833, is a son of Samuel and grandson of Fones Scranton. He is a painter by trade, having followed the business here about twenty years. He enlisted in August, 1862, in Company K, 18th Connecticut volunteers, and served until the close of the war as second lieutenant. In 1880 he bought the marble and granite works of William P. Adams' estate, which business he has since conducted. He was married in 1857 to Elizabeth Macomber, who died in 1886. They had two children: Fannie M. (Mrs. George L. Wilson, of St. Paul, Minn.) and Samuel (deceased). Mr. Scranton is a democrat, and a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M.

Job F. Seamans was born in 1846 in Scituate, R. I. He is a son of Silas, whose father, job, was a son of Thomas Seamans. His mother was Alvira, daughter of Joseph Cole. Mr. Seamans is a shoe manufacturer. His father started a shoe factory in East Killingly, which he conducted until his death in 1883, under the firm name of S. Seamans & Son. Since 1883 the firm has been J. F. Seamans & Co. In 1887 the business was moved to Mechanic street, Danielsonville, where it is still running, with from eighteen to twenty hands. Mr. Seamans was a member of the legislature in 1878, and again in 1886. He was married in 1869 to Rosa, daughter of Frank McGrindy. They have two daughters, Nora F. and Ellie. He is a member of the Congregational church, a republican, a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M., and a prominent member of the order.

Albert E. Shippee, born in 1844 in Foster. R. I., is a son of Philip and grandson of Anthony Shippee. His mother was Dorcas, daughter of Caleb Simmons. Mr. Shappee came from Rhode Island to Williamsville in 1859, and with the exception of a few years he has worked for the Williamsville Manufacturing Company, having been for seventeen years overseer of spinning. He was in the war of the rebellion from December, 1863, to October, 1865, in Company D, 1st Connecticut volunteers, and was promoted from private to sergeant in April, 1864. He was married in 1863 to Fannie Keene, and has one daughter. He is a member of McGregor Post, No. 27, G. A. R. He started a livery stable in 1873, which he still runs.

Willis H. Shippee, Jr., born in 1864, is a son of Willis H. and grandson of Robert, whose father, Willard, was a son of Esek Shippee. His mother, Laura, is a daughter of Lebbeus Graves, son of David, son of Eseker, son of Lebbeus Graves. Willis H., Jr., was educated in the schools of Killingly, took a commercial course at Eastman's College and has since been a teacher. He was married in December, 1885, to Ida C., daughter of Cyrus Mitchell, son of Zebedee, son of William, son of Zebedee Mitchell.

Daniel S. Shumway, born in 1809 in Killingly, is a son of Noah and grandson of Peter Shumway. His mother was Lucy, daughter of Thomas Dyke. Mr. Shumway resided in Burrillville, R. I., from the age of four years until 1870, when he returned to Killingly, where he was station agent at Dayville for twelve years for the Norwich & Worcester railroad. Since 1882 he has lived retired. He was married in 1839 to M. Rebecca, daughter of Samuel Stiness, a sea captain, who was born in 1775 and died in 1816. She died in 1864, leaving five children: Henry H., James D., Sarah S. (Mrs. Benjamin Cogswell), Mary D. (now the widow of John Stokes) and Rebecca L.

Almeda Simmons is a daughter of Stephen and Nancy (Law) Smith, the latter a daughter of George Law. She is a granddaughter of Jeremiah and Joanna (Wilkinson) Smith. She married William Simmons, a son of Robert Simmons. He was a farmer and stone cutter, living in Foster, R. I., until his death. Since 1884 Mrs. Simmons has lived at East Killingly.

Alfred N. Smith was born in 1856 in Columbus, Ga. He is a son of Benoni, whose father, John, was a son of Doctor John Smith. His mother was Mary A., daughter of Silas Bailey. Mr. Smith worked in a store in Plainfield about four years. He came to Danielsonville and bought a residence in 1887, and fitted up one part for a store, where he does a general grocery and flour, feed and grain business. He was married in 1881 to Hattie, daughter of A. H. Bennett, of Canterbury. They have one daughter, Susie B. Mr. Smith is a republican and a member of the Baptist church of Danielsonville.

Russell F. Smith, born in 1860 in Killingly, is the youngest son of John and grandson of John Smith.. His mother was Susan, daughter of Henry Fenner. He was for seven years salesman in the Attawaugan store, and for the last year he has been travelling salesman for a bakery firm of Hartford. He was married in 1882 to Carrie, daughter of William Tarbox. He is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M.

Henry Sparks was born in 1812 in Killingly. He is a son of Henry W., who was in the war of 1812, and died in 1886, aged 94 years. He was the son of John and grandson of Samuel Sparks. The mother of Henry was Lois, daughter of Abner Day. Mr. Sparks is a farmer and has lived in the house that he now occupies since 1815. He was married in 1838 to Lydia Ann, daughter of Jonathan and Loraina (Sparks) Aldrich. They have twelve children: Mary A., William H. H., Charlotta A., Lois D., Cassius M. C., Cassius M., John Q. A., Lurena B., Laura R., Julius A., Lilla N. and George W. I. Mr. Sparks is a republican.

P. H. Sprague, born in 1832 in Scotland, Conn., is a son of William B. and Joanna (Hutchins) Sprague, grandson of Samuel and Ruhama (Borden) Sprague, and great-grandson of Daniel and Selah (Wadsworth) Sprague. His great-great-grandparents were Thomas and Susanna Sprague.. According to the records, she joined the South Killingly church in 1776. Mr. Sprague's mother, Joanna, was a daughter of Penuel Hutchins, M. D., a son of Ezra, whose father, John, was a son of Nicholas Hutchins, who came from England to Groton, Mass., in 1670. Mr. Sprague has been a carpenter for about thirty years. He was married in 1871 to Lora J., daughter of John Mahrs. He is a republican, a member of the Westfield Congregational church, and a member of the Masonic order.

Clara B. Stokes is a daughter of John Stokes, who was born in Wiltshire, England, in 1817, came to Providence, R. I., in 1848, and thence to Pascoag, R. I., where he worked for a manufacturing company for seventeen years. He came from there to Dayville in January, 1.866, where for about ten years he was in the employ of the Sayles Manufacturing Company. He was married in 1836 to Phebe, daughter of John Gregory. The names of their seven living children are: Ann (Mrs. Robert Kershaw), Elizabeth (Mrs. E. K. Spaulding), Sarah J. (Mrs. H. Hanks), Fannie (Mrs. A. P. Bennett), Emeline (Mrs. I. L. Blanchard), Charlotte A. (Mrs. Dr. A. E. Darling) and Clara B. Stokes. They lost seven children: John, Elizabeth, Maria, Elnora, Mary E., Lillian M. and Lily E. Miss Stokes is an enthusiastic temperance worker, as is also her father.

Joseph W. Stone was born in November, 1830, in Massachusetts. He is a son of Reverend George, whose father, Joseph, was a son of George Stone. His mother was Olive, daughter of George and Betsey (Adams) Cundall, of Brooklyn, Conn. Mr. Stone is a harness maker by trade. He had charge of the harness department of L. M. Dean's works at Woodstock for eighteen years prior to 1871. At that time he came to Danielsonville and established a harness store, which he has since conducted. He has been justice since 1878. He was married in 1852 to Caroline A. Leach, of Putnam. Conn. They have one son, George M., and one daughter that died-Ella C. Mr. Stone has been a deacon of the Congregational church about ten years.

Warren Taft was born in 1817 in Burrillville, R. I. He is the oldest son of Moses, whose father, Moses, was a son of Myaman Taft. His mother vas Sally (Ballard) Taft. He is a carpenter by trade. He came from Rhode Island to East Killingly in 1843, where he has lived since that time. He had charge of the building of the Whitestone Cotton Mill, in 1856, and had charge o f repairs there until 1870. In September of that year he was made superintendent of the Ross Mill, where he continued until August, 1886, and since that time he has been a farmer. He was married in 1840 to Almira, daughter of Reverend Jonathan Oatley. They have two daughters: Almira E. and Mary J. Mr. Taft is a republican.

Israel G. Tefft, born in 1823 in Exeter, R. I., is a son of Jonathan, and grandson of Sprague Tefft. His mother was Mary, daughter of Israel Gates. Mr. Tefft is a farmer. In 1850 he went from Exeter, R. I., to Norwich, Conn., where he was a farmer until 1874, when he removed to Danielsonville and has been engaged in gardening and small fruit raising. Mr. Tefft was deacon of the Baptist church of Baltic about fifteen years. He has been deacon of the Danielsonville Baptist church about thirteen years. He was married in 1846 to Elcea M. Wilcox. They had three children: Mathew and Susan (twins, deceased), and William J. Mrs. Tefft died in 1871, and one year later Mr. Tefft was married to Mrs. Sarah Grant. Mr. Tefft is a staunch prohibitionist and an ardent worker in the temperance cause.

Hugh Thompson, born in 1852, is a son of James and Mary J. Thompson, and grandson of William Thompson. He was for several years with S. & H. Sayles, and has been with T. E. Hopkins since 1881. Since October, 1886, he has been overseer of weaving. He was married in July, 1872, to Almira M., daughter of Cyrus Mitchell. They have five children: Albert, Charles, Martha J., Benjamin and Ernest. Mr. Thompson is a member of St. Alban's church of Danielsonville, and a member of John Lyon Lodge, No. 45, K. of P.

William H. Tyler, born in 1848 in Middleton, Mass., is the son of Allison and Abigail (Wilkins) Tyler. In February, 1869, Mr. Tyler came to Danielsonville, where he had charge of the stitching department of the shoe factory of Abner Young for four years. He was afterward clerk for the James Brothers for eight years. He had charge of the " Moss Mills " store of Putnam for about six years. In April. 1887, he opened a grocery store on Furnace street, which he has run since that time. He was married in June, 1879, to Lucinda M., daughter of Ezra Allen. They have one son, Harry D. He is a member of the Danielsonville Baptist church and a republican.

Isaac Wade, born in 1818 in Rhode Island, is the youngest son of Charles, whose father Isaac, was a son of Nathaniel Wade. His mother was Sarah, daughter of Jonathan Pray. He was a cotton mill operative for about forty years, and for the last ten years has been a farmer. He was married in 1841 to Sylvia Young, who died leaving four children: Emily, Otis, Clovis and Charles. He was married again to Juliette Edson in 1863. They have four children: John, Fred, Nancy and Maud. Mr. Wade is a prohibitionist and a member of East Killingly Baptist church.

John Waldo, born in 1826 in Canterbury, Conn., is a son of Rufus, and grandson of John E. Waldo. His mother was Harriet, daughter of Simon Shepard. Mr. Waldo was brought up on a farm with his father. He taught school eight winters. About 1852, in company with his brother Simon S., he went into a variety store in Danielsonville. In 1861 they built a new block on the same site where their old store stood. Since 1870 they have dealt principally in flour and grain. Mr. Waldo was a member of the legislature in 1884. He was married in 1846 to Lydia, daughter of Elijah Rathbon. He has been a director in the Windham County National Bank for about twenty years, and a deacon in the Congregational church about thirty years. He is a republican.

Anthony D. Warren was born in 1820. He is a son of Dyer, whose father Eleazar, was born in 1760, and bore the same name as his father, who was representative in the general assembly in 1775. He was the son of Eleazar, and grandson of Ephraim Warren, who died in 1747, and was buried on Breakneck hill, in Killingly. Mr. Warren followed teaching as a profession until 1856, and since that time he has been a farmer. He was on the school committee three years, and selectman seven years, as a republican.

Lysander Warren, born in 1815 in Killingly, is a son of Dyer and Minerva (Durfee) Warren. Mr. Warren is a farmer. He came from Killingly Centre to his present residence in 1847. He has been on the school board about thirty years, and justice for about the same length of time. He was representative in the legislature in 1858, 1868 and 1878. He was married in 1844 to Marcia, daughter of James Mason. They have one daughter living, Angie V., now Mrs. Charles A. Perkins, and two that died, Josephine and Emma. He is a republican.

Edward L. Warren was born in 1824 in Killingly. He is a son of Artemas, and grandson of Eleazar. His mother was Sarah Cleveland. Mr. Warren is the youngest of six children. He is a farmer, owning and occupying a farm that has been in the Warren family for several generations. He built the house where he now lives in 1873. He was married in 1844 to Lucretia, daughter of Jonathan Parkhurst. They have five children: Lewis J., Lucius A., Frank P., Henry C. and Anna L. Mr. Warren is a democrat.

Frank P. Warren, born in 1852, is a son of E. L. Warren. His education was obtained in the public schools of the town. He is a farmer, although he has paid considerable attention to the wood and lumber business. He was three years selectman, and in 1884 was representative in the legislature. He was married in 1879 to Rose, daughter of William Ross. They have one son, Ernest R.

Henry C. Warren, born in 1855 in Killingly, is a son of E. L. Warren. He was educated at Danielsonville high school. His musical education was principally with H. L. Aynesworth, of Worcester. He began to teach music in 1874, and has from fifty to seventy pupils. He was married March 18th, 1879, to Emma E., daughter of Willard Barber, and has one son, Edmund L: He and his wife are members of the First Baptist church of Danielsonville, and he is a member of tna Lodge, No. 21, A. O. U. W.

Joseph W. Warren, born May, 1844, is the eldest son of Lester R., whose father, Ephraim, was a son of Ephraim Warren. His mother was .Tabitha E., daughter of Joseph Arnold. He was educated at the public schools of the town of Killingly, and has taught school since 1870. He was married in 1870 to Isabelle M., daughter of Jonathan Young. They have two children, Eva L. and Milton S. Mr. Warren is a republican and a member of the East Killingly Free Will Baptist church.

Daniel R. Weaver was born in 1814 in Coventry, R. I. He is the only surviving son of Joseph, whose father, Jonathan, was a son of Joseph Weaver. His mother was Anna Greene, and his grandmother was Elsie (Weaver) Weaver. Mr. Weaver is a farmer. He came from Coventry, R. I., to Killingly in 1862. He was married in 1837 to Betsey A. Austin. She died leaving one son, Charles H., of California. He was married a second time October 7th, 1S79, to Phbe, daughter of Benjamin Tillinghast, of West Greenwich, R. I., and granddaughter of Benjamin Tillinghast. He is a member of the Free Will Baptist church, and a republican.

George Warren Webster, born in April, 1832, in Pomfret. is the eldest son of Ezekiel, who was born in 1805 and died in 1868, grandson of John and Sarah (Pease) Webster, and great-grandson of John Webster, who went from Massachusetts to Maine, where most of the family now live. His mother was Esther (Cudworth) Webster. Mr. Webster was educated in district and select schools. He came to Dayville with his father in 1842, his father having built the Dayville Hotel prior to that time. He started an axe and pick handle factory here about 1860, and a short time later began to deal in lumber, coal and grain, which business he still continues. He took charge of the Killingly post office January 25th, 1886, having been appointed the September previous. He was married to Nancy Sabin, who died in 1856. He married for his second wife Ellen L., daughter of Horace Woodard. She died in 1879, leaving one son, George W., Jr. He was married again in 1879 to a daughter of Chester Carder. He is a prominent Mason, having attained to the degree of knight.

John E. Webster, brother of George W. Webster mentioned above, was born in 1840. He was an iron broker in Hartford from 1865 to 1853, and since that time he has lived at Dayville, where he owns and operates a small farm. He was married in 1864 to Amanda E., daughter of George Eddy, who was a son of Amasa Eddy, who was a nominee for lieutenant governor of Rhode Island in 1842, with Thomas W. Dorr for governor. His mother was Mary A., daughter of Captain Smith Mowry, of Rhode Island. They have four children: John E., Jr., Lillian E., Mary E. and Alice E. He is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M., and also member of Washington Commandery, No. 1, of Hartford.

John Welch, son of Martin Welch, was born in 1817 in Ireland, and came from there to Killingly about 1848, where he has since lived. Since 1880 he_ and his son Louis have kept a livery and teaming- stable at Attawaugan. He was married in 1852 to Elizabeth Wright, who died leaving two children-William and Mary Ann. He was married again in 1862 to Sarah Cassidy. They have one son-Louis T. Mr. Welch is a democrat.

Ludentia A. Weld and Harriet N. Whitmore were born in Killingly. They are daughters of Reverend Roswell Whitmore, who was born in 1787 in Ashford. He was pastor of the Congregational church of Westfield from 1813 to 1843, and afterward was pastor of a branch of the same church at Dayville eight years. He was a son of Jacob and Hannah (Brown) Whitmore. Mr. Whitmore was married November 4th, 1813, to Avis, daughter of Shubael Hutchins. They had four daughters: Frances M. and Abbie R., deceased; and Harriet N. and Ludentia A., who now live in the same house where their parents began housekeeping and lived the most of their lives. Ludentia A. was married in 1838 to S. L. Weld. They had two children, Roswell W., of Chicago, and Harriet F. (Mrs. Reverend Joseph Danielson). Mr. Weld died in 1865. He was teacher. of a select school for about twenty years. He was a deacon of the Congregational church.

David B. Wheaton.-Lucas Wheaton, of Swansea, Mass., was the father of Resolved Wheaton, who with his wife Zerviah (Buck) Wheaton, settled on a farm in the north part of the town, where the family now lives, at which place their youngest son, David B., was born in 1810. He married in 1834, Almira J., daughter of James Pratt. They had six children: George Henry, Sarah J., Sabra W., Lucy A., and two that died-George R. and Lucas R. George Henry is a carpenter by trade, although he spends a part of each year working on the farm with his father. Sarah J. is a teacher, having taught fifty-two terms of school.

William H. Williams was born in 1846 in Foster, R. I. He is a son of Henry D. and grandson of Xerxes, whose father, Squire Williams, was great-grandson of Roger Williams. His mother was Lovina, daughter of Robert Simmons. Mr. Williams is a. miller, and was seven years in the Attawaugan grist mill. In December, 1879, he came to Danielsonville, where he has since run the grist mill for the Quinebaug Manufacturing Company. He built a fine residence on Maple street, in Danielsonville, in 1884. He was married in 1874 to Lydia A., daughter of Lucius and Sabra (Bowen) Horton. They have two sons: Charles W.. and Lucius B. Mr. Williams is a prohibitionist.

Bertha L. Wilson is the only daughter of Seth Wilson, who was a son of Zadeck and Ann (Robinson) Wilson, the latter a daughter of Seth Robinson. Seth Wilson married Emily Curtis,. who :, died shortly_ after. He later married Ellen M. Lee, whoa was the mother of his two children: George L., now a resident of St. Paul, Minn., and Bertha L. Seth was a farmer and owned and occupied the homestead where his father settled about 1815- He died in 1864, and Ellen M., his wife, died in 1883.

Wesley Wilson was born August 26th, 1844, in Eastford, Conn. He is a son of Orrin, who was the youngest son of Charles Wilson. His mother is Amanda Havens. Mr. Wilson began in the mercantile business in 1867 in Putnam, as salesman for J. W_ Manning, where he remained about fourteen years. He was then six years bookkeeper for the Quinebaug store in Danielsonville. In 1887 he took charge of two stores for the Attawaugan Manufacturing Company where he now is. He was married in 1868 to Emily E. Briggs. They have one daughter, Nellie A. Mr. Wilson is a member of Etna Lodge, No. 21, A. O. U. W., a republican and a member of the Danielsonville Congregational church.

Julius F. Winkelman, son of Charles Winkelman, was born in 1837 in Germany, and came to this country in 1865. He lived at Mystic, Conn., until 1872, when he came to Danielsonville. In 1876 he started a shoe store and shoe shop of his own in the Central Hotel block, where he continued until 1888, when he divided the business into two stores, his son, Charles, taking charge of one. He learned his trade in the old country. He was married in 1868 to Dinah Gensle. They have four children: Charles, Augusta, Julius and Frank.

Alton E. Withington, son of Edwin and Abbie A. Withington, was born in 1853 in Massachusetts. He is a photographer, having learned the art at Milford, Mass. January 1st, 1874, he bought the business of E. B. Slator, and since that time has con-tinued in the business in Danielsonville. He was married June 15th, 1876, to Ida M., daughter of William E. and Philippa Graham. They have one daughter, Orcilla. William Graham was in the war of the rebellion in Company G, 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery, and was promoted from private to first lieutenant. He was a carriage painter by trade. He died several years since.

Marcus Wood was born in 1834 in Killingly. He is a son of Olney M., son of Levi, son of Aaron, whose father, Noah, was a son of John Wood, who came from England to Swansea, Mass. His mother is Dorcas, daughter of Jeremiah and Dorcas Young. Mr. Wood was interested in mercantile business for eleven years in different places prior to 1867. At that time he in company with his brother bought a general store at Dayville, which they ran until 1886. He was postmaster at Killingly about seventeen years. He has been a music teacher for about twenty years, and since 1886 has devoted his time to music. He has led the singing in the Congregational church here for fifteen years. He was married in 1854 to Ellen E., daughter of Lott Mitchell. She died in May, 188 7 . He is a member of Moriah Lodge, No. 15, F. & A. M.

Amariah Wood, son of Olney M. Wood, was born in 1840 in Killingly. He was educated in the schools of Killingly. In 1859 he came to Dayville, where he was clerk in the store of Sayles & Potter until 1867. At that time he in company with his brother Marcus Wood, bought the business and continued in the same until 1886, when they sold out to William P. Kelley. Mr. Wood has been bookkeeper for Kennedy Brothers for the past year.

Simon H. Wooddell, born in Foster, R. I., in 1844, is a son of James B. and grandson of William Wooddell. He bought the grocery department of the store of J. A. Paine at Chestnut Hill in 1875, where he continued until 1885. He took possession of a farm on the road from Ballouville to Chestnut Hill in June, 1887, where he has lived since that time. He was married in 1870 to Flora M., daughter of job W. Hill.

Wheeler W. Woodward was born in 1834 in Brooklyn, Conn. He is a son of Augustus and Caroline (Wheeler) Woodward, grandson of Ward and Rebecca (Putnam) Woodward, and greatgrandson of Ephraim and Huldah (Cram) Woodward. Ephraim was a son of John, Jr.. and Hannah (Hyde) Woodward, whose parents were John and Rebecca (Robbins) Woodward, whose father, George Woodward, was born in England in 1621; his father, Richard Woodward, was born in 1589 in England, and came from there with his family in 1634 to Watertown, Mass. John, Jr., above mentioned, came from Massachusetts to Canterbury, Conn., about 1710, settling on a farm which remained in the Woodward family until 1880. Mr. Woodward's grandfather, Ward, served in the war of the revolution, Mr. Woodward purchased the drug business of Crandall & Ladd in Danielsonville in 1868, which he has carried on since. He was married in 1865 to Anna Ross. They have three children: Mary I., Arthur P. and William F. Mr. Woodward is a member of the Baptist church of Danielsonville, and has been clerk and treasurer of the same for several years. He is a republican.

Abner Young, son of Israel Young, was born in 1819 in Killingly. He began the carpenter's trade at the age of 19, working at it seventeen years. Then he ran a shoe factory for seventeen years. In 1874 the firm of H. S. Young & Co. was established, Abner Young being the junior partner. In 1884 H. S. Young died, and since that time Abner has carried on the clothing business alone. Mr. Young was representative in the legislature in 1873. He has been warden of the borough two years. He was married in 1842 to Emily Baker. She died in 1857, leaving three children: Henry S., George W. and Eugene. He married Juliette Westcott in 1858. They had two children: Clarence W., who died, and J. Emily. Mr. Young is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and holds the office of trustee and steward. He is a republican.

Abner S. Young was born January 11th, 1855, in Killingly. He is a son of Jonathan, whose father, Israel, was a son of Othaniel Young. His mother is Janette, daughter of Israel Dorman. At the age of seventeen years he began to learn the carpenter's trade, which he has followed since that time. For the last five years he has been a contractor and builder. He was married in 1877 to Clara, daughter of John Dexter, son of Marvin A., who was a son of Joseph, a descendant from Gregory Dexter, who "came to Providence in 1643. He was the fourth pastor of the First Baptist church in America. They have one son, Earl A. D. Mr. Young is a republican.

Charles E. Young, born in May, 1849, is a son of Guilford and grandson of Othaniel Young. Mr. Young is a carpenter by -trade. In 1877 he took charge of the Windham Company's grist mill at Attawaugan, which he has run since that time. He was married in 1870 to Mary E., daughter of Stephen Tripp. _ She -died April 10th, 1886. They had three children: Lily May (deceased), Frank E. and C. Fred. He is a member of Assawaga Lodge, No. 20, A. O. U. W., a member of John Lyon Lodge, No. 45, K. of P., and a member of the Congregational church of Brooklyn. He is a republican.

Ezra H. Young, born in 1818 in Sterling, Conn., is a son of Stephen, whose father was Jonah Young. His mother was Margaret (Bennett) Young. Mr. Young in 1865 bought a farm in -the north part of the town where he has since resided. He was married in 1843 to Laura Burgess. She died in 1852, leaving two children: Ellen M. and Emerzetta. He was married in 1854 to Mrs. Mary Brown, daughter of Jacob Burgess. He is a democrat.

Jonah S. Young, born in 1809, is a son of Zephaniah, whose father, Jonah, was a son of Elder Asa Young. Mr. Young is a .farmer. He was married in 1830 to Marcy Colvin, who died in 1833. He was married in 1834 to Maria O. Hubbord, who died in 1836. He was married in 1837 to Laura Spaulding. They have had eleven children, all of whom have died. Labin Harrington, born in 1824, is a son of Zephaniah, whose father, William, was a son of Amos Harrington. He has lived for the last thirty years with Mr. Jonah S. Young.

Jonathan Young, born in 1818 in Killingly, is a son of Israel -and grandson of Othaniel Young. His mother was Margaret (Chase) Young. He is a -farmer, having lived at his present home since 1848.- He was married in 1843 to Janette Dorman, who died in 1877. They had eight children, four of whom -are living: Isabel M., Abner S., Emily J. and Charles W.

Maxey W. Young, oldest son of William Young, was born in 1839. His mother is Amy, daughter of Arnold Watson. Mr. Young was a farmer and mill operative until 1862. In August of that year he enlisted in Company K, 18th Connecticut volunteers, and served until June, 1864, when he was discharged on account of disability. Since 1864 he has been a farmer and mill operative. He was two years in Knoxville, Tennessee, helping set up and start a cotton mill in 1886 and 1887. He was married in 1874 to Eleanor, daughter of William Warren, and has one daughter, Josephine H. He is a republican, although he had formerly been a democrat. He is a member of Post No. 51, G. A. R., of Dayville.

Additional Offsite Biographies

Back to: Killingly, Windham County, Connecticut History

Source: History of Windham County, Connecticut, Bayles, Richard M.; New York: W.W. Preston, 1889

 

 

 

Back to: Windham County, Connecticut Genealogy


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